August 28, 2020

Tumour traces in blood could predict which cancer patients will benefit from immunotherapy

OICR-supported researchers and collaborators discover indicators in the blood that may predict which patients will respond to the immunotherapy drug, pembrolizumab

Dr. Scott Bratman, Cindy Yang, Dr. Lillian Siu, Dr. Trevor Pugh

Adapted from UHN’s Media Release.

Immunotherapy can shrink tumours and prolong survival for certain cancer patients, but clinicians don’t yet know which patients will benefit from these treatments. OICR-supported researchers and collaborators at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have made a discovery that could help identify those patients who may benefit and match them with potentially life-saving therapies.

In their study, recently published in Nature Cancer, the research group found that the changing levels of tumour fragments, or circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA), in a patient’s blood can be used to predict whether they will respond to the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab.

The study lays the foundation for researchers to develop an easy, non-invasive and quick blood test to determine who will benefit from the drug and how well their disease is responding to treatment.

“While we have known for some time that cancer disease burden can be monitored by measuring tumour DNA in the blood, we are excited to report that the same concept can be applied to track the progress of patients being treated with pembrolizumab,” says co-first author Cindy Yang, PhD Candidate in Dr. Trevor Pugh’s lab at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and OICR. “This will hopefully provide a new tool to more accurately detect response and progression in patients undergoing immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. By detecting progression early, patients may have the opportunity to undergo subsequent lines of treatment in a timely fashion.”

The benefits of blood tests

Conventionally, imaging scans – such as computerized tomography (CT) scans – and other methods are used to monitor a patient’s cancer. This study suggests a simple and quicker blood test as an alternative to these scans.

“Although important, computerized tomography (CT) and other scans alone will not tell us what we need to know quickly or accurately enough,” says senior author Dr. Lillian Siu, Senior Scientist and medical oncologist at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre.

Dr. Scott Bratman, radiation oncologist and Senior Scientist at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and co-first author of the study, points out that it may take many months to detect whether a tumour is shrinking with various imaging scans. 

“New next-generation sequencing technologies can detect and measure these tiny bits of cellular debris floating in the blood stream accurately and sensitively, allowing us to pinpoint quite quickly whether the cancer is active.”

This study represents one of the many emerging applications of using ctDNA to guide treatment decisions. It is one of the first to show that measuring ctDNA could be useful as a predictor of who responds well to immunotherapy across a broad spectrum of cancer types. 

The prospective study analyzed the change in ctDNA from 74 patients, with different types of advanced cancers, being treated with pembrolizumab. Of the 74 patients, 33 had a decrease in ctDNA levels from their original baseline levels to week six to seven after treatment with the drug. These patients had better treatment responses and longer survival. Even more striking was that all 12 patients who had clearance of the ctDNA to undetectable levels during treatment were still alive at a median follow-up of 25 months.   

Conversely, a rise in ctDNA levels was linked to a rapid disease progression in most patients, and poorer survival.   

“Few studies have used a clinical biomarker across different types of cancers,” says Siu, who also co-leads OICR’s OCTANE trial. “The observation that ctDNA clearance during treatment and its link to long-term survival is novel and provocative, suggesting that this biological marker can have broad clinical impact.” 

Innovation and translation

This study is part of a larger flagship clinical trial, INSPIRE, which has enrolled more than 100 patients with head and neck, breast, ovarian, melanoma and other advanced solid tumours. INSPIRE brings together researchers from many disciplines to investigate the specific genomic and immune biomarkers in patients that may predict how patients will respond to pembrolizumab.

INSPIRE is made possible by collaborations across institutes and industries with expertise from those applying genomics to research and those applying genomics in the clinic.

“INSPIRE is an incredibly collaborative initiative that is a blend of big genomics – looking at large trends across many individuals – and highly-personalized genomics – looking at mutations within each patient sample,” says Pugh, co-senior author, Senior Scientist at Princess Margaret and Senior Investigator and Director of Genomics at OICR. “This is a modern approach to the translation of clinical genomics.”

“As a PhD student, this project gave me the unique opportunity to work in a highly collaborative intersection with industry, clinical, and academic partners,” says Yang. “It is very exciting to see translational research in action.”

Read the UHN Media Release.

August 25, 2020

New advances towards targeted therapies for triple negative breast cancer

OICR-supported researchers demonstrate new drug may eliminate triple negative breast cancer cells in certain patients, discover a new method to identify which patients will benefit

Dr. Mathieu Lupien
Dr. Mathieu Lupien (Images by Delmar)

Adapted from UHN’s Media Release.

Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly aggressive subtype of breast cancer that often spreads to other organs and accounts for one in four breast cancer deaths. OICR-supported researchers at the University Health Network’s Princess Margaret Cancer Centre are zeroing in on the molecular mechanisms that fuel this deadly cancer’s runaway growth to develop more effective treatments for this disease.

In their study, recently published in Nature Communications, they found a promising approach that could potentially identify the patients who could benefit from a more precise, targeted therapy for TNBC.

“This disease has no precision medicine, so patients are treated with chemotherapy because we don’t have a defined therapeutic target,” says co-lead of the study Dr. Mathieu Lupien, Senior Scientist at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and OICR Investigator. “Initially, it works for some patients, but close to a quarter of patients recur within five years from diagnosis, and many develop chemotherapy-resistant tumours.”

“These savage statistics mean that we must improve our understanding of the molecular basis for this cancer’s development to discover effective, precise targets for drugs, and a companion test to identify which patients are most likely to benefit the most from such a therapy.”

The study investigated how TNBC cells are dependent on a specific protein called GLUT1 and its associated molecular pathways. Prior studies suggested that TNBC cells were dependent on GLUT1, but this study is the first to demonstrate that blocking GLUT1 function may be an effective therapeutic strategy for certain patients with TNBC.

Using a collection of cell lines, the researchers found that blocking this pathway with a drug-like chemical compound “starved” the cancer cells, but only in a subset of TNBC patient samples. The group investigated further and found a common trait between the cell lines that were sensitive to the drug – they had high levels of a protein called RB1. This indicates that patients with TNBC and high levels of RB1 may, one day, benefit from this drug.

“Having access to diverse cell models of triple-negative breast cancer allows us to distinguish where the potential drug will work, and where it won’t,” says Lupien. “Without this broad spectrum of samples, we might have missed the subset of triple-negative breast cancers that respond to our compound.”

Dr. Cheryl Arrowsmith
Dr. Cheryl Arrowsmith (Photo credit: The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation)

Collectively, this study suggests that clinical evaluation of targeting GLUT1 in certain patients with TNBC is warranted.

“The more we understand about the molecular complexity of cancer cells, the more we can target with precision,” says co-lead of the study Dr. Cheryl Arrowsmith, Chief Scientist for the Structural Genomics Consortium Toronto laboratories and Professor of Medical Biophysics at the University of Toronto. “And the more we can build up a pharmacy of cancer drugs matched to specific changes in the cancer cell, the greater the chance of a cure.”

Read UHN’s Media Release.

July 29, 2020

Q&A with new OICR investigator Dr. Courtney Jones on benefitting patients through research

OICR welcomes Dr. Courtney Jones to Ontario’s cancer research community

Courtney Jones

Starting up an independent research lab in the midst of a pandemic is difficult but Dr. Courtney Jones is up for the challenge. Jones moved to Canada prior to the lockdown and has been gearing up for new experiments since. Now, as an OICR Investigator, she has safely started working in her lab at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre to find new solutions for the leading cause of leukemia deaths in Canada – acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

Continue reading – Q&A with new OICR investigator Dr. Courtney Jones on benefitting patients through research

July 24, 2020

OICR research leads to new pancreatic cancer clinical trial with aim to change the standard of care for patients

New pancreatic cancer trial, NeoPancONE, launches across Canada

NeoPancONE

Adapted from Pancreatic Cancer Canada’s press release.

OICR’s PanCuRx team and collaborators have launched NeoPancONE, a Phase II clinical trial that will evaluate a potentially curative treatment strategy for operable pancreatic cancer. The trial, which is supported by Pancreatic Cancer Canada, will recruit patients at 10 cancer centres across the country to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of peri-operative chemotherapy – chemo treatment before and after surgery.

Typically, only 50 per cent of pancreatic cancer patients receive chemotherapy after surgery due to a range of personal and health reasons. NeoPancONE will help evaluate whether chemotherapy treatment before surgery can help extend the lives of these individuals.

Continue reading – OICR research leads to new pancreatic cancer clinical trial with aim to change the standard of care for patients

June 23, 2020

Diagnosing brain tumours with a blood test

A blood test to diagnose and classify tumours could be revolutionary and practice-changing for patients and clinicians alike. In many cases, a simple blood sample could take the place of more invasive surgery to obtain tissue samples – resulting in better treatment planning and less anxiety for patients.

University Health Network’s (UHN) Drs. Daniel De Carvalho and Gelareh Zadeh collaborated to combine advanced technology with machine learning to develop a highly sensitive and accurate blood test to detect and classify brain cancers. Photo Credit: UHN

In an OICR-supported study recently published in Nature Medicine, researchers have shown that a simple but sensitive blood test can accurately diagnose and classify different types of brain tumours. With further research and development, the test could serve as a less-invasive method to detect, diagnose and classify the severity of brain tumours.

The study was also presented virtually on June 22 at the Opening Plenary Session of the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2020: Turning Science into Lifesaving Care.

Continue reading – Diagnosing brain tumours with a blood test

March 2, 2020

Study reveals roots of leukemia that current chemotherapies can’t reach

John Dick

Researchers find the roots of leukemia relapse are present at diagnosis, uncovering clues to new treatment approaches

Despite significant advances in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the disease often returns aggressively in many patients after treatment. It is thought that current chemotherapies eliminate most leukemia cells, but groups of resistant cells may survive therapy, progress and eventually cause relapse. Dr. John Dick and collaborators have found these cells.

In a recent study published in Cancer Discovery, Dick and collaborators were able to identify and isolate groups of genetically distinct cells that drive ALL relapse.

The cells, termed diagnosis relapse initiating (dRI) clones were found to have genetic characteristics that differ from the other leukemia cells that are eliminated by treatment.

The study, along with a complementary study published in Blood Cancer Discovery, unraveled the genetic, epigenetic, metabolic and pro-survival molecular pathways driving treatment resistance. Together, these papers provide an integrated genomic and functional approach to describing the underlying genetics and mechanisms of relapse for ALL.

Interestingly, the research group discovered that dRI clones are present at diagnosis, opening opportunities to improve treatment up-front, devise drugs that target these resistant cells and prevent relapse from ever occurring.

Dr. Stephanie Dobson

“Our study has shown that genetic clones that contribute to disease recurrence already possess characteristics such as therapeutic tolerance that distinguish them from other clones at diagnosis,” says Dr. Stephanie Dobson, first author of the study who performed this research as a member of John Dick’s Lab. “Being able to isolate these clones at diagnosis, sometimes years prior to disease recurrence, has enabled us to begin to profile the properties allowing these particular cells to survive and act as reservoirs for relapse. This knowledge can be used to enhance our therapeutic approaches for targeting relapse and relapse-fated cells.”

“Xenografting added considerable new insight into the evolutionary fates and patterns of subclones obtained from diagnosis samples,” says John Dick, who is the co-senior author of the study, Senior Scientist at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and leader of OICR’s Acute Leukemia Translational Research Initiative. “We were able to gather extensive information about the genetics of the subclones from our models, which helped us describe the trajectories of each subclone and the order in which they acquired mutations.”

Ordering these mutations relied on the advanced machine learning algorithms designed by Dr. Quaid Morris and Jeff Wintersinger at the University of Toronto.

Research efforts are underway to build on these discoveries and determine how to block dRI clones.

The study was led by researchers at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and the University of Toronto and supported in part by OICR’s Acute Leukemia Translational Research Initiative.

This post has been adapted from the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital news release.

January 13, 2020

Unique Toronto-based clinical trial reveals new subtypes of advanced pancreatic cancer

Drs. Faiyaz Notta and Steven Gallinger, Co-Leaders of OICR’s Pancreatic Cancer Translational Research Initiative (PanCuRx).

Researchers identify five subtypes of pancreatic cancer, uncovering new opportunities for targeted treatment of the aggressive disease

Toronto – (January 13, 2020) Researchers at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR) and the University Health Network (UHN) have discovered detailed new information about the subtypes of pancreatic cancer. A better understanding of the disease groups may lead to new treatment options and improved clinical outcomes for this lethal disease.

The study, published today in Nature Genetics, represents the most comprehensive analysis of the molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer to date. Through detailed genomic and transcriptomic analyses, the research group identified five distinct subtypes of the disease (Basal-like-A, Basal-like-B, Classical-A, Classical-B, and Hybrid) with unique molecular properties that could be targeted with novel chemotherapies, biologics and immunotherapies.

“Therapy development for pancreatic cancer has been hindered by an incomplete knowledge of the molecular subtypes of this deadly disease,” says lead author Dr. Faiyaz Notta, Co-Leader of OICR’s Pancreatic Cancer Translational Research Initiative (PanCuRx) and Scientist at UHN’s Princess Margaret Cancer Centre. “By rigorously analyzing advanced pancreatic cancers – which is the stage of disease that most patients have when they’re diagnosed – we were able to create a framework. This will help us develop better predictive models of disease progression that can assist in personalizing treatment decisions and lead to new targeted therapies.”

The study is based on data from more than 300 patients with both early stage and advanced pancreatic cancer who participated in COMPASS, a first-of-its-kind clinical trial that is breaking new ground in discovery science and personalized pancreatic cancer treatment. COMPASS is enabled by advanced pathology laboratory techniques at UHN and OICR, and next generation sequencing at OICR.

“Most pancreatic cancer research is focused solely on early stage – or resectable – tumours, but in reality, pancreatic cancer is often found in patients after it has advanced and spread to other organs,” says Notta. “COMPASS allowed us to look into these advanced cancers while treating these patients, develop a better understanding of the biology behind metastatic pancreatic cancer, and shed light on the mechanisms driving disease progression.”

Interestingly, the Basal-like-A subtype, which had been difficult to observe before this study, was linked with a specific genetic abnormality. Most of the Basal-like-A tumours harboured several copies of a mutated KRAS gene, also known as a genetic amplification of mutant KRAS. The research group hypothesizes that some of the subtypes arise from specific genetic changes that occur as pancreatic cancer develops.

“This research opens new doors for therapeutic development,” says Dr. Steven Gallinger, Co-Leader of OICR’s PanCuRx, Surgical Oncologist at UHN and Senior Investigator, Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital. “We look forward to capitalizing on the promise of these discoveries, building on our understanding of pancreatic cancer subtypes, and bringing new treatments to patients with the disease.”

This research was supported by OICR through funding provided by the Government of Ontario, and by the Wallace McCain Centre for Pancreatic Cancer by the Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation, the Terry Fox Research Institute, the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute, the Pancreatic Cancer Canada Foundation, the Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University and the Cancer Research Society (no. 23383).

October 15, 2019

‘I’m here to help address important and challenging questions in health’

OICR Biostatistics Training Initiative Fellow and newly-minted PhD, Dr. Osvaldo Espin-Garcia, dedicates his career to cutting-edge clinical cancer research

Osvaldo Espin-Garcia

For Dr. Osvaldo Espin-Garcia, an industry-based job wouldn’t suffice. Having already worked in banking, insurance and telecommunications, Espin-Garcia found that his skills in statistics could be applied to a field that he was much more passionate about. For him, that was health research.

Combining his skills in math with his interest in health, Espin-Garcia left his job in Mexico and moved to Canada to pursue the University of Waterloo’s Master of Mathematics program. His strong academic performance secured him an internship at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre (PM) where he found his niche in statistical genetics.

“Despite advancements in sequencing technologies, the path between a new -omics discovery and applying that discovery in the clinic remains cumbersome and often costly, especially in large-scale studies,” says Espin-Garcia, who recently completed his PhD at the University of Toronto’s Dalla Lana School of Public Health. “We can use statistical techniques and tools to design better trials and make sense of this sequencing data in more efficient ways.”

Espin-Garcia’s internship laid the foundations for his PhD research, where he developed statistical methods and analysis tools to examine the data from genome-wide studies – studies that look at the entire set of genes across many individuals.

In these studies, researchers often examine a sample subset of patient genomes from a large group of patients. These samples are often selected randomly, but Espin-Garcia’s methods allow researchers to select these patients in a “smarter” way.

“Choosing patients randomly is an inefficient way to perform post-genome-wide studies since this strategy fails to incorporate the information that is already available,” says Espin-Garcia. “Our methods allow us to select subgroups of patients whose data will give us rich insights into challenging research questions. That’s what I’m here for, I’m here to help address important and challenging questions in health.”

For this work, Espin-Garcia was awarded a Biostatistics Training Initiative (BTI) Fellowship, which helped him fast-track the development of his methods and the completion of his PhD.

Now, as a Senior Biostatistician at PM, he is specializing in gastrointestinal cancer studies and continues to develop and apply new tools to support the clinical cancer research community.

“I am grateful for the support I’ve received throughout my training to build my collaborative relationships with clinicians and scientists and learn from incredible mentors,” says Espin-Garcia. “I look forward to supporting more cutting-edge clinical cancer research in the future.”

BTI, a training program co-led by OICR, the University of Waterloo and McMaster University, has supported numerous fellows, like Espin-Garcia, and other studentships over the last decade.

To learn more about the BTI Program, please visit the OICR BTI Program page, the University of Waterloo’s BTI webpage or read more about some of the past studentships.

July 17, 2019

New research unfolds the DNA “origami” behind brain cancers

Collaborative research group maps the three-dimensional genomic structure of glioblastoma and discovers a new therapeutic strategy to eliminate cells at the roots of these brain tumours

Current treatment for glioblastoma – the most common type of malignant brain cancer in adults – is often palliative, but new research approaches have pointed to new promising therapeutic strategies.

A collaborative study, recently published in Genome Research, has mapped the three-dimensional configuration of the genome in glioblastoma and discovered a new way to target glioblastoma stem cells – the self-renewing cells that are thought to be the root cause of tumour recurrence.

The research group integrated three-dimensional genome maps of glioblastoma with other chromatin and transcriptional datasets to describe the mechanisms regulating gene expression and detail the mechanisms that are specific to glioblastoma stem cells. They are one of the first groups in the world to perform three-dimensional genomic analyses in patient-derived tumour samples.

Dr. Mathieu Lupien

“The 3D configuration of the genome has garnered much attention over the last decade as a complex, dynamic and crucial feature of gene regulation,” says Dr. Mathieu Lupien, Senior Scientist at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, OICR Investigator and co-author of the study. “Looking at how the genome is folded and sets contacts between regions tens to thousands of kilobases apart allowed us to find a new way to potentially tackle glioblastoma.”

Through their study, the group discovered that CD276 – a gene which is normally involved with repressing immune responses – has a very important role in maintaining stem-cell-like properties in glioblastoma stem cells. Further, they showed that targeting CD276 may be an effective new strategy to kill cancer stem cells in these tumours.

Lupien adds that advancements in three-dimensional genomics can only be made through collaborative efforts, like this initiative, which was enabled by OICR through Stand Up 2 Cancer Canada Cancer Stem Cell Dream Team, OICR’s Brain Cancer Translational Research Initiative and other funding initiatives.

“This research was fueled by an impressive community of scientists in the area who are committed to finding new solutions for patients with brain cancer,” Lupien says. “Our findings have emphasized the significance of three-dimensional architectures in genomic studies and the need to further develop related methodologies to make sense of this intricacies.”

Senior author of the study, Dr. Marco Gallo will continue to investigate CD276 as a potential therapeutic target for glioblastoma. He plans to further delineate the architecture of these cancer stem cells to identify more new strategies to tackle brain tumours.

Dr. Marco Gallo

“A key problem with current glioblastoma treatments is that they mostly kill proliferating cells, whereas we know that glioblastoma stem cells are slow-cycling, or dormant. Markers like CD276 can potentially be targeted with immunotherapy approaches, which could be an effective way of killing cancer stem cells, irrespective of how slowly they proliferate,” says Gallo, who is an Assistant Professor at the University of Calgary. “Being able to kill cancer stem cells in glioblastoma could have strong implications for our ability to prevent relapses.”

Read more about OICR’s Brain Cancer Translational Research Initiative on oicr.on.ca or read about the Initiative’s current findings on OICR News.

July 3, 2019

Five fellows, four labs, three years, two countries, and a generous donation

Joesph Lebovic and the fellows


The Lebovic Fellowship program connects scientists in Israel and Ontario, leading to the validation of a new drug candidate for leukemia and the optimization of a new potential cancer vaccine

Three years ago, the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) received a donation from Joseph and Wolf Lebovic – two brothers who are Holocaust survivors, Canadian immigrants, avid philanthropists and recently-appointed Members of the Order of Canada. Their vision was to strengthen collaboration between the outstanding researchers in Israel and those in Ontario to accelerate cancer research.

They created the Joseph and Wolf Lebovic Fellowship Program, which paired together laboratories specializing in complementary subjects. The Program’s first round of projects officially came to a successful close today and here we recognize the progress made thanks to the generous donation of the Lebovic brothers.

Developing a drug for leukemia

Israel lead researcher: Dr. Yinon Ben-Neriah, IMRIC
Israel fellows: Waleed Minzel and Eric Hung, PhD Candidates, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Ontario lead researcher: Dr. John Dick, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre (PMCC)
Ontario fellow: Dr. Laura Garcia-Prat, Postdoctoral Fellow, PMCC

Ben-Neriah’s lab in Israel had developed a new compound and showed it may be a valuable anti-leukemia drug, but they couldn’t explain why the drug was only effective in animal models that had strong immune systems. Understanding the relationship between the drug and the immune system would allow them to validate which leukemia subtypes would respond to their therapeutic approach.

John Dick’s lab had developed the gold standard for evaluating the efficacy of leukemia drugs in animal models using sophisticated patient-derived xenograft mouse models. Through this fellowship, the Ben-Neriah Lab teamed up with the Dick lab to learn from their expertise and gain insights into their experimental models.

Continue reading – Five fellows, four labs, three years, two countries, and a generous donation

March 19, 2019

Understanding intermediate-risk prostate cancer: The whole may be greater than the sum of its parts

Collaborative research group performs the most comprehensive analysis of curable prostate cancer to date, finds key connections between different data types

As cancer researchers delve deeper into different omics studies, and technologies enable their ability to do so, it is becoming increasingly important to understand how these areas of research are interconnected. Previous studies across multiple omes – such as the genome, proteome, transcriptome or epigenome – have led to important discoveries in colorectal cancer and ovarian cancer, but prostate cancer remains largely unresolved. Researchers from the Canadian Prostate Cancer Genome Network (CPC-GENE) set out to unravel some of these mysteries.

In the most recent CPC-GENE study, published today in Cancer Cell, the research group integrated multiple levels of omics analyses to better understand the biology of intermediate-risk prostate cancer – a type of cancer in which it is notoriously difficult to predict and treat accordingly. A better understanding of this disease could lead to improved tests that can determine which tumours are aggressive and require aggressive treatment, while helping spare those whose cancer will never become aggressive the negative side effects of treatment.

“We cannot overlook the important information that we gain from looking at the bigger picture,” says Julie Livingstone, bioinformatician at OICR and co-author of the study. “In this case, this means looking at prostate cancer from multiple angles – or multiple omes – to potentially find new markers of aggressive disease.”

The study explored 76 prostate cancer tumours and found new combinations of information that could act as a better predictor of a patient’s chance of relapse than any single piece of information alone. More specifically, they identified that the combination of protein and methylation data could, on average, predict the severity of a tumour better than looking at just the proteins – the proteome – or just the methylation patterns – the methylome – alone.

“Integrating datatypes is anything but straightforward, but it illuminates interesting aspects about prostate cancer that we haven’t seen before,” says Livingstone. “In the future, we intend to pursue our multi-omic investigation and translate this understanding into better tools to inform treatment selection for men with this disease.” 

Find out more about research from the CPC-GENE project on OICR News.

October 16, 2018

Bringing cutting-edge imaging techniques to clinical trials

Dr. Catherine Coolens with new DCE-CT calibration device

OICR offers new CT calibration service as part of its Collaborative Research Resources portfolio

Using imaging devices to help make treatment decisions in the clinic requires rigorous testing, quality assurance and routine calibration of the imaging machinery. These standards are especially important when the imaging technology is novel or unique, such as in the case of perfusion imaging – a relatively new technique used to diagnose a cancer’s stage by showing how blood flows through the tumour.

Continue reading – Bringing cutting-edge imaging techniques to clinical trials

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