August 22, 2018

Meet the researchers: Ratheesh Subramaniam

Ratheesh Subramaniam talks about his work in OICR’s Drug Discovery team and how it could help doctors make a difference in treating cancer patients.

July 31, 2018

Can an open drug discovery model find a solution for rare brain cancers in children?

Dr. Aled Edwards

Dr. Aled Edwards

OICR-funded drug discovery project’s unique ‘open science’ business model is accelerating the search for a solution to lethal pediatric brain cancers

Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a lethal and inoperable brain cancer with a median survival of less than a year from diagnosis. Finding solutions to this disease is challenging due to its rarity, scientific complexity and its presentation in pediatric populations. An OICR-funded team of researchers, led by Dr. Aled Edwards from M4K Pharma, have developed new potential drug candidates for DIPG that they will test in animal models in the coming months. They’ve reached this milestone ahead of schedule, with fewer resources required than anticipated, by using an ‘open drug discovery’ approach – sharing their methods and data with the greater research community to streamline the drug discovery process.

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December 4, 2017

OICR launches groundbreaking Cancer Therapeutics Innovation Pipeline to drive cutting-edge therapies to the clinic

Ten new projects were selected in the pipeline’s inaugural funding round, highlighting Ontario’s strengths in collaboration and drug discovery.

Toronto (December 4, 2017) – The Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR) today announced the Cancer Therapeutics Innovation Pipeline (CTIP) initiative and the first 10 projects selected in CTIP’s inaugural round of funding. CTIP aims to support the local translation of Ontario discoveries into therapies with the potential for improving the lives of cancer patients. The funding will create a new pipeline of promising drugs in development, and attract the partnerships and investment to the province necessary for further clinical development and testing.

“Ontario congratulates OICR on this innovative approach to driving the development of new cancer therapies,” says Reza Moridi, Ontario’s Minister of Research, Innovation and Science. “The Cancer Therapeutics Innovation Pipeline will help ensure that promising discoveries get the support they need to move from lab bench to commercialization, and get to patients faster.”

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July 12, 2017

Ovarian cancer research team working to exploit disease’s vulnerabilities

Drs. Amit Oza and Rob Rottapel

Given the advancements in treating many other types of cancer, it may come as a surprise that outcomes for patients with the most deadly form of ovarian cancer have not improved in 50 years. This form, known as High Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer (HGSOC), accounts for 80 per cent of ovarian cancer deaths in Canada. Surgery and chemotherapy can be effective, but ultimately three-quarters of women with HGSOC will see their disease return. To deliver better outcomes for patients, OICR has launched a new ‘all star team’ of ovarian cancer researchers.

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February 10, 2017

How chemical probes can boost cancer research

Dr. David Uehling in the Lab.

Guest post by David Uehling, PhD, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, on behalf of the Chemistry In Cancer Research Working Group, part of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).

The quest for a new cancer drug often begins when a protein target is implicated as an important driver in tumourigenesis. For cancer researchers, small molecules that block or stimulate such proteins can be valuable tools in research. Not only do they help us understand the role that the protein plays in cancer biology, but they also enable researchers to demonstrate which tumours are sensitive toward inhibition or stimulation with that protein target of interest, providing early clues as for patient selection and biomarker identification. Moreover, the knowledge that a small molecule can bind to such a protein builds confidence that this target is indeed “druggable,” which can provide a powerful stimulus to initiate a sustained effort to find medicines for that target.

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