August 16, 2016

New research published on the role of noncoding RNA in prostate cancer

Dr. He

Noncoding RNA may play a bigger role in driving prostate cancer development and progression that previously thought. 

On Monday the University Health Network’s Princess Margaret Cancer Centre announced that prostate cancer researchers, funded in part by OICR, have pinpointed the key regulatory role of 45 noncoding genes in the development and progression of prostate cancer. The research was published in Nature Genetics.

Continue reading – New research published on the role of noncoding RNA in prostate cancer

July 4, 2016

OICR congratulates Drs. Mark Levine, Eduardo L. Franco and Gerald Batist, new recipients of the Order of Canada

Dr. Mark Levine

Three cancer researchers were invested into the Order of Canada over the weekend, including Dr. Mark Levine, C.M., who was honoured for his contributions as an oncologist, researcher and clinician and because he has developed several new treatments for cancer patients that are now used as standard of practice in Canada.

Levine is Director of the Ontario Clinical Oncology Group (OCOG), Chair of the Department of Oncology for the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine at McMaster University and a medical oncologist at Juravinski Cancer Centre at Hamilton Health Sciences.

Continue reading – OICR congratulates Drs. Mark Levine, Eduardo L. Franco and Gerald Batist, new recipients of the Order of Canada

June 28, 2016

OICR’s Dr. Clare Jeon discusses how the discovery of protein signatures could lead to cheaper, easier diagnostic tests for prostate cancer

Dr. Clare JeonResearchers at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, University Health Network and Eastern Virginia Medical School, in a paper published today in the journal Nature Communications, have identified protein signatures in urine that can accurately diagnose aggressive prostate cancer. The signatures could be used to develop a test for prostate cancer that uses a patient’s urine sample to determine whether he has prostate cancer and another test that could identify how aggressive the disease is. This would help to replace more invasive tests such as PSA test and biopsy, which also have high rates of over-diagnosis and in many cases lead to over-treatment.

Continue reading – OICR’s Dr. Clare Jeon discusses how the discovery of protein signatures could lead to cheaper, easier diagnostic tests for prostate cancer

June 1, 2016

Making prostate cancer diagnosis more PRECISE

Dr. Laurence Klotz of the Sunnybrook Research Institute

Dr. Laurence Klotz of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre is a world leader in the field of prostate cancer research. He has been a champion of active surveillance (also known as watchful waiting) for over 20 years, an approach to prostate cancer treatment that has allowed thousands of men with low-risk prostate cancer to avoid or delay therapy by monitoring it closely instead of immediately treating it.

Now Klotz has launched a new clinical trial called PRECISE, funded with $3 million in support by the Movember Foundation, the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and Prostate Cancer Canada, that will use MRI to help to better diagnose prostate cancer without invasive biopsy.

Continue reading – Making prostate cancer diagnosis more PRECISE

June 1, 2016

Clinical trial launched to test use of MRI to improve prostate cancer diagnosis and management

Research supported by the Movember Foundation, the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and Prostate Cancer Canada

Toronto, ON – June 1, 2016 – The Movember Foundation, the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR) and Prostate Cancer Canada today announced $3 million in funding for a new Phase III clinical trial to evaluate if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can replace the current standard of care to diagnose prostate cancer. The primary objective of the multi-centre trial, called PRECISE, is to determine whether MRI imaging can spare some men from undergoing a biopsy and avoid the possible associated side effects.

The trial will be led by Dr. Laurence Klotz of the Sunnybrook Research Institute in Toronto, a world leader in the field of prostate cancer research and in the global adoption of active surveillance, a standard practice to monitor patients with low risk prostate cancer.

Continue reading – Clinical trial launched to test use of MRI to improve prostate cancer diagnosis and management