August 11, 2016

OICR’s Geoff Fong receives major funding to examine e-cigarettes and the impact of public health policy

Around the world it has become common to walk down the street and see a new trend – people vaping (using e-cigarettes). The widespread use of e-cigarettes has caught the attention of the scientific community. Recently, OICR Investigator Dr. Geoff Fong was awarded funding from Canadian and U.S. federal funding agencies to evaluate the impact of e-cigarettes and determine the effectiveness of policies around their use.

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May 17, 2016

Dr. Eva Grunfeld named as Chair of new Canadian Institute of Health Research Institutes Advisory Board on Chronic Conditions

Dr. Eva Grunfield - Bio picture. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) named Professor Eva Grunfeld as the inaugural Chair of the new Institutes Advisory Board (IAB) on Chronic Conditions. In her role, Grunfeld, Giblon Professor and Vice Chair (Research) at the Department of Family and Community Medicine at U of T, will help determine the future directions of research in chronic disease in Canada.

The management and prevention of chronic diseases in Canada represents one of the biggest challenges to our healthcare system

“It’s a great opportunity to contribute to the development of the new IAB structure – the aim of which is to improve integration across CIHR Institutes,” said Grunfeld, who is physician-scientist and Director of the Knowledge Translation Research Network, Health Services Research Program, at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research. “Particularly with chronic conditions, it’s important to coordinate and cooperate across disciplines, across health conditions, and across research pillars. I’m looking forward to working with the other IAB chairs, IAB and members, and Institute Directors to impact research on chronic conditions in Canada.”

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May 2, 2016

$2 million in new funding from Canadian Institutes of Health Research will help Ontario team study metabolic syndromes

Dr. Philip Awadalla

Dr. Philip Awadalla

Toronto (May 2, 2016) – Dr. Philip Awadalla, Senior Investigator at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and Principal Investigator for the Ontario Health Study has been awarded $2 million by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).  The award will fund the study of the role of both genes and the environment on the development of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of medical conditions that are common in aging adults, including obesity, hypertension, high cholesterol, high blood sugar and insulin resistance.

These conditions are considered to be both risk factors and causal factors in the development of cancer and chronic diseases like heart disease, stroke and diabetes. A better understanding of how to prevent and treat the conditions of metabolic syndrome could also help in the design of new strategies to prevent these diseases before they develop.

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December 1, 2015

OICR Investigator profile: Dr. Philip Awadalla

Dr. Philip AwadallaThe rise of genomics has provided scientists in many fields with insights that would not have been possible only a couple of decades ago. When Dr. Philip Awadalla first became interested in molecular genetics and evolution, genome technologies were just beginning to come to the fore.

“We didn’t have a human genome sequenced yet – the Human Genome Project was not completed – and we were still trying to answer very basic questions, like how many genes do humans have or which genes are important,” says Awadalla, who recently joined OICR as a Principal Investigator. “However, these basic questions are important, because both genomics and the mathematical models for understanding how it functions are the underpinning of all the tools we use in every field of genomics. You can’t understand how a genome works unless you understand where it came from.”

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