October 23, 2017

Pathology Matters 2017 unites and informs Ontario’s pathology community

Pathology Matters attendees take part in a group discussion.

In this post, Monique Johnson shares how the Ontario Molecular Pathology Research Network’s (OMPRN) 2017 Pathology Matters Meeting provided her with new insights into the field and introduced her to Ontario’s molecular pathology community.

Continue reading – Pathology Matters 2017 unites and informs Ontario’s pathology community

September 6, 2017

OICR launches Tissue Portal to support tissue-based research projects

Fu Yan - In the lab.

OICR’s Tissue Portal is a new central entry and exit point for human tissue derived samples handled at OICR. This will serve as a gateway for tissue-based research projects to access over 100 services and resources at OICR being made available through the OICR Collaborative Research Resources on a cost-sharing basis. The Tissue Portal will standardize and streamline the storage, processing and distribution of samples for collaborative research studies at OICR.

Continue reading – OICR launches Tissue Portal to support tissue-based research projects

June 7, 2017

New grant program boosts molecular pathology research in Ontario

Two lab technicians work in a lab.

The Ontario Molecular Pathology Research Network (OMPRN) recently awarded $675,000 of funding to support molecular cancer pathology research in Ontario. The 11 funded projects will involve 22 investigators and seven trainees and address clinically-relevant questions in bladder, brain, breast, endometrial, cervical, renal, pediatric and hematological cancers. The 26 applications that were submitted for review demonstrate the high quality and rich diversity of cancer pathology research in the province. Please visit the Funded Projects page for more information.

OMPRN’s mission is to enhance molecular pathology research capacity across the province by fostering collaboration and cooperation between Ontario academic pathologists, increasing the participation of pathologists in high-quality translational cancer research, and providing opportunities for residents, fellows and early career pathologists to obtain training and mentorship in cancer research. In line with these objectives, all of the research projects funded through OMPRN’s Pathology Translational Research Grants (CPTRG) program are led by pathologists, address questions of clear relevance to cancer care and incorporate important elements of transdisciplinary collaboration and mentorship. Trainees and early career researchers involved in these projects will be supported in their research through attending regular meetings of OICR’s Pathology Club.

The next round of the CPTRG program will be announced in the fall of 2017. Information may be found here: https://ontariomolecularpathology.ca/research-funding

November 23, 2016

OICR and OMPRN celebrate International Pathology Day with educational events

A technician works in OICR pathology lab

On November 16 OICR and the Ontario Molecular Pathology Research Network (OMPRN) joined other organizations around the world celebrating International Pathology Day.

Continue reading – OICR and OMPRN celebrate International Pathology Day with educational events

November 16, 2016

International Pathology Day 2016

A pathology researcher looks at a slide.

Today is International Pathology Day. Around the world and here in Ontario events will be held to raise awareness of the field and its contributions to modern medicine. The work of the Transformative Pathology Program, coupled with the launch of the Ontario Molecular Pathology Research Network (OMPRN), has made for a very successful year thus far for OICR’s efforts in pathology research. Here are some of the highlights. Continue reading – International Pathology Day 2016

November 4, 2016

Beyond the crime scene: You don’t have to be dead to need a pathologist

Cafe Scientifique banner

Dr. John Bartlett, from the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, and Dr. Michelle Downes, from Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, will take you into a world of pathology beyond crime scene investigation and into puzzles more complex than an escape room. They will talk about the future of pathology and how this is changing the face of medicine and why a pathologist is considered ‘the doctor’s doctor’.

The Duke of York Pub – November 16, 6-8 p.m.
39 Prince Arthur Avenue, Toronto
near St. George subway station

Register at Eventbrite >

October 28, 2016

Pathology Matters: One attendee’s reflections on OMPRN’s first gathering of Ontario pathologists

OMPRN Logo

Dr. Matt Cecchini was one of many pathologists and researchers, including 21 trainees, to attend the inaugural Pathology Matters meeting hosted by the Ontario Molecular Pathology Research Network (OMPRN). In this post he covers what he learned at the meeting, where the field is going and how that impacts his training and research.

Continue reading – Pathology Matters: One attendee’s reflections on OMPRN’s first gathering of Ontario pathologists

October 27, 2016

OICR’s Transformative Pathology Program contributes to recent PanCuRx findings

Ilinca Lungu, a Research Technician in OICR’s Transformative Pathology Program, talks about her group’s contributions to recent findings from the PanCuRx Translational Research Initiative.

Access to the Transformative Pathology Program’s resources and expertise is available to the research community through Diagnostic Development in OICR’s Collaborative Research Resources Directory. For more information about how you can access these services, visit oicr.on.ca/collaborative-research-resources.

October 21, 2016

OICR-led study finds four unique genomic signatures in pancreas cancer, uncovers potential of immunotherapies

The pancreas cancer puzzle

Pancreas cancer is one of the most aggressive and deadly forms of the disease. According to the Canadian Cancer Society, only 8 percent of pancreas cancer patients survive more than five years after diagnosis. OICR’s PanCuRx Translational Research Initiative has recently published the results of an international collaboration that increases understanding of this complex disease and how to treat it based on a patient’s unique profile.

Continue reading – OICR-led study finds four unique genomic signatures in pancreas cancer, uncovers potential of immunotherapies

October 13, 2016

An interview with Dr. David LeBrun, leader of OICR’s new molecular pathology network

Dr. David LeBrun

Dr. David LeBrun is heading up the Ontario Molecular Pathology Research Network (OMPRN), which was announced at the end of September. It will be funded by OICR, based at Queen’s University and will include pathologists from across the province.

Continue reading – An interview with Dr. David LeBrun, leader of OICR’s new molecular pathology network

September 29, 2016

OICR funding new network to enhance molecular pathology research in Ontario

omprn-announce

Today OICR announced the launch of the Ontario Molecular Pathology Research Network (OMPRN), which will be based at Queen’s University and will bring together pathologists across the province.

Pathology is key to the early detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. An accurate diagnosis can provide better prognostic information and allow doctors to better target therapies. Pathology research can also lead to the development of new treatments that target specific cancer-driving mutations, genes and pathways, reducing the need for treatments with unwanted side effects.

Continue reading – OICR funding new network to enhance molecular pathology research in Ontario

September 21, 2016

New partnership brings Toronto researchers together to better understand the molecular origins of breast cancer

Slide preperation

Researchers from the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital have enlisted the help of OICR’s Transformative Pathology Program in their ongoing research to identify common biomarkers for breast cancer – and ultimately to better diagnose and target treatment for patients.

Continue reading – New partnership brings Toronto researchers together to better understand the molecular origins of breast cancer

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