July 11, 2017

New multi-disciplinary team taking a stem cell-based approach to target acute leukemia

TEchnicians work in a stem cell research lab.

The rising use of stem cell-based therapies has illustrated the power of stem cells to treat a number of diseases. Now a group of Ontario researchers are looking at the promise of stem cells from a different perspective. Amongst other efforts, they are developing and testing new therapies that target and kill leukemic stem cells to lessen the chances of acute leukemias (AL) coming back following standard treatment.

Continue reading – New multi-disciplinary team taking a stem cell-based approach to target acute leukemia

June 28, 2017

Ontario researchers identify rare therapy-resistant stem cells linked to AML patient relapse

By combining new knowledge from the fields of stem cell biology and genetics, a group of Ontario researchers led by Dr. John Dick have solved the mystery of why some acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients relapse after initial treatment.

Continue reading – Ontario researchers identify rare therapy-resistant stem cells linked to AML patient relapse

January 26, 2017

Dr. John Dick to present 2017 Tobias Award Lecture

Dr. John Dick

The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) has honoured Dr. John Dick by selecting him to deliver the 2017 Tobias Award Lecture at the organization’s annual meeting June 14-17 in Boston. The honour, supported by the Tobias Foundation, recognizes promising research into stem cell therapies for haematological conditions.

Continue reading – Dr. John Dick to present 2017 Tobias Award Lecture

December 7, 2016

Cancer stem cell scientists create tool to aid in planning treatment for leukemia

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common form of acute leukemia in adults and is one of the most deadly. Although AML is treated as a single disease, patient response to intensive curative-intent chemotherapy varies. It is currently difficult to predict who will do well with standard treatment, and who will not benefit from standard treatment and might do better enrolling in a clinical trial where they may be offered novel therapies.

Continue reading – Cancer stem cell scientists create tool to aid in planning treatment for leukemia

August 9, 2016

Patients need access to more stem cells for transplants. Researchers have now identified the genetic switch that could turn on the supply

DSC_3341

 

Researchers at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, funded in part by OICR, have found a genetic switch that could be used to develop many more stem cells from the blood found in umbilical cords, a resource that is highly valuable for stem cell transplants but still in short supply.

Continue reading – Patients need access to more stem cells for transplants. Researchers have now identified the genetic switch that could turn on the supply