March 18, 2021

OICR appoints Dr. Steven Gallinger as Head, Clinical Translation

Gallinger brings more than three decades of clinical and interdisciplinary research experience to OICR leadership

Dr. Steven Gallinger has joined OICR’s executive leadership team as Head, Clinical Translation. In this role, he will lead one of OICR’s three key priority areas, Clinical Translation, which focuses on advancing Ontario cancer discoveries through early clinical validation, partnering with industry and the health system for downstream development and implementation.

Gallinger has more than three decades of experience as a surgical oncologist specializing in hepato-pancreatico-biliary surgeries. He is internationally recognized for establishing one of the largest population-based colon cancer registries, and he is well-known for his pancreatic cancer research, through which he has made significant contributions to large-scale genomics studies like the International Cancer Genome Consortium. Gallinger is passionate about building large biospecimens and data repositories to enable research discoveries.

In conjunction with Gallinger’s appointment, OICR is also proud to announce Dr. Glenn Bauman will continue as a Clinical Lead for Clinical Translation. Bauman, who has led several OICR research initiatives and clinical trials over the last 10 years, is a Radiation Oncologist at the London Health Sciences Centre who focuses on genitourinary and central nervous system tumours.

“The entire OICR executive is thrilled to have Dr. Gallinger join our leadership team,” says Dr. Laszlo Radvanyi, President and Scientific Director, OICR. “Steven’s deep experience as both a clinician and researcher will help OICR strengthen our bridge between the lab and the clinic. The continued contributions of Dr. Bauman will further accelerate our efforts to get novel solutions to patients in Ontario and around the world.”

“Translating research findings to improve clinical care is complex,” says Dr. Christine Williams, Deputy Director, OICR. “Success depends on the engagement of many partners, including the health system, health regulators and in some cases the private sector, as well as scientists, clinicians and especially patients and their families. Drs. Gallinger and Bauman are leaders in forging these partnerships and translating research into practice. We’re proud to welcome Dr. Gallinger to OICR’s executive team and delighted that OICR will continue to benefit from Dr. Bauman’s scientific leadership.”

Among his many career accomplishments, Gallinger and the multidisciplinary team at Princess Margaret has been the driving force behind the COMPASS clinical trial, which has led to seminal discoveries that are paving the way for new personalized pancreatic cancer therapies. As Head of Clinical Translation, Gallinger will continue co-leading the pancreatic cancer PanCuRx Translational Research Initiative and build upon PanCuRx’s translational achievements.

“This is an exciting time at OICR,” says Gallinger. “We’re looking to build on our existing networks and research successes. As we embark upon our new Strategic Plan, I think we can reach out and support research across more cancer centres so that we can work together to benefit patients sooner, while keeping Ontario at the forefront of precision cancer medicine.”

As part of her Deputy Director role, Williams will continue to oversee the Clinical Translation networks of the Clinical Translation portfolio, including the Canadian Cancer Clinical Trials Network, the Ontario Cancer Research Ethics Board and the Ontario Health Study.

August 29, 2019

Addressing high priority issues in cancer care

An image of the report cover. Text: Addressing high priority issues in cancer care

OICR and Cancer Care Ontario’s Health Services Research Network releases the 2019 Synthesis Report, summarizing 14 studies that address high priority issues in cancer care

An excerpt from the foreword by Drs. Christine Williams and Eva Grunfeld:

Optimal cancer care across Ontario cannot be solely provided by a clinician or implemented by a researcher, enacted by a policy maker or attained by a patient. To improve the delivery of cancer services, we need to work together with stakeholders from across our rich cancer care ecosystem and involve them in prioritizing concerns, designing interventions and implementing solutions. For these reasons, OICR and Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) teamed up to co-create the OICR-CCO Health Services Research Network (HSRN).

Now, a decade later, we present our second Synthesis Report with an additional 14 studies that have emerged from this network. These studies have addressed high priority issues in cancer care including the gap in follow up after a positive colorectal cancer screening test, and the challenges that cancer patients face with co-existing chronic conditions like diabetes. The studies have led to the development of new methods to determine the burden of cancer in Ontario, and new resources to facilitate health services research across the province. This report provides summaries of these studies and others and their impact to date.

Read more about the OICR-CCO HSRN.

July 11, 2018

New funding for the Canadian Cancer Clinical Trials Network will help more cancer patients access clinical trials

Toronto (July 11, 2018) – The Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR) and the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (the Partnership) today announced renewed funding for the Canadian Cancer Clinical Trials Network (3CTN). The funding will ensure Canada remains a world leader in academic cancer clinical trials, help to increase opportunities for patients to receive promising new treatments and continue to improve outcomes for cancer patients through research.

Continue reading – New funding for the Canadian Cancer Clinical Trials Network will help more cancer patients access clinical trials

February 14, 2018

What can we do to better support women in science?

Women in science - using a robot.

At OICR and FACIT, women play a vital role in both ground-breaking cancer research and leading innovations from the lab to the marketplace – benefitting patients and the Ontario economy. In the first part of this two part series, female executives, leaders, directors, and scientists from OICR and FACIT shared their perspectives on challenges facing women in science. Now they discuss what can be done to address these challenges.

Despite the advances made in recent years, achieving equality and parity in science remains a significant challenge for policy-makers, organizations and the scientific community at large. We spoke with a panel of women from OICR and FACIT about the approaches to parity in science, discussing strategies and changes to better represent and support women.

Continue reading – What can we do to better support women in science?

February 12, 2018

Where are all the women in science?

At OICR and FACIT, women play a vital role in both ground-breaking cancer research and leading innovations from the lab to the marketplace – benefitting patients and the Ontario economy. These women also acknowledge the challenges and barriers for women within the field of science. The International Day of Women and Girls in Science, on February 11, calls for greater commitment to end bias, increased investment in STEM for all women and girls and opportunities for their long-term professional advancement. In the first part of this two-part story, female executives, leaders, directors, and scientists from OICR and FACIT share their perspectives on the challenges faced by women in science.

Continue reading – Where are all the women in science?

December 4, 2017

OICR launches groundbreaking Cancer Therapeutics Innovation Pipeline to drive cutting-edge therapies to the clinic

Ten new projects were selected in the pipeline’s inaugural funding round, highlighting Ontario’s strengths in collaboration and drug discovery.

Toronto (December 4, 2017) – The Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR) today announced the Cancer Therapeutics Innovation Pipeline (CTIP) initiative and the first 10 projects selected in CTIP’s inaugural round of funding. CTIP aims to support the local translation of Ontario discoveries into therapies with the potential for improving the lives of cancer patients. The funding will create a new pipeline of promising drugs in development, and attract the partnerships and investment to the province necessary for further clinical development and testing.

“Ontario congratulates OICR on this innovative approach to driving the development of new cancer therapies,” says Reza Moridi, Ontario’s Minister of Research, Innovation and Science. “The Cancer Therapeutics Innovation Pipeline will help ensure that promising discoveries get the support they need to move from lab bench to commercialization, and get to patients faster.”

Continue reading – OICR launches groundbreaking Cancer Therapeutics Innovation Pipeline to drive cutting-edge therapies to the clinic

March 8, 2017

In London, OICR leaders discussed cancer research advancements being made in the city. How can OICR help further translate these breakthroughs to patients?

London, Ontario

Ontario’s wealth of cancer research expertise is not limited to one city or region. Innovations from researchers and clinician-scientists across the province are changing the approach to cancer worldwide. London is one of Ontario’s major cancer research nodes and boasts a particular strength in developing medical imaging technology. The city is home to the Lawson Health Research Institute, Robarts Research Institute and the Centre for Imaging Technology Commercialization. Life science and biotechnology research is the source of $1.5 billion in economic activity for the city annually.

Continue reading – In London, OICR leaders discussed cancer research advancements being made in the city. How can OICR help further translate these breakthroughs to patients?

September 29, 2016

OICR funding new network to enhance molecular pathology research in Ontario

omprn-announce

Today OICR announced the launch of the Ontario Molecular Pathology Research Network (OMPRN), which will be based at Queen’s University and will bring together pathologists across the province.

Pathology is key to the early detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. An accurate diagnosis can provide better prognostic information and allow doctors to better target therapies. Pathology research can also lead to the development of new treatments that target specific cancer-driving mutations, genes and pathways, reducing the need for treatments with unwanted side effects.

Continue reading – OICR funding new network to enhance molecular pathology research in Ontario

June 29, 2016

OICR welcomes Dr. Christine Williams

Dr. Christine Williams

This April OICR welcomed Dr. Christine Williams as Deputy Director and Vice-President, Outreach. Williams joins OICR from The Canadian Cancer Society, where she was the Chief Mission Officer, responsible for overall leadership of the organization’s activities in research, policy, advocacy, information and support programs. Prior to that she was the national Vice-President, Research at the Society where she oversaw a cancer research budget of $40 million each year.

Continue reading – OICR welcomes Dr. Christine Williams