July 10, 2018

Targeting epigenetic proteins could help prevent breast cancer

Dr. Julie Livingstone

Researchers further clarify the role of epigenetic proteins in the development of breast cancer, and discover that inhibiting these proteins could prevent the disease in women at high risk.

Continue reading – Targeting epigenetic proteins could help prevent breast cancer

June 14, 2018

New OICR President and Scientific Director comments on breakthrough in breast cancer T-cell immunotherapy

Dr. Laszlo Radvanyi

For the first time, a patient’s late-stage breast cancer has been successfully treated with T-cell immunotherapy. This cutting-edge approach, which is currently in clinical trials in the U.S., modified the patient’s naturally-occurring immune cells to fight her tumours that had spread throughout her body. The patient has been cancer free for the past two years and her remarkable tumour regression represents the potential impact of this new immunotherapeutic approach.

Continue reading – New OICR President and Scientific Director comments on breakthrough in breast cancer T-cell immunotherapy

June 4, 2018

New guidelines for HER2 testing in breast cancer

An image of the HER2 protein.

Current HER2 tests help predict which breast cancer patients will respond to HER2-targeted therapies, but sometimes these tests provide unclear results. An Expert Panel of pathologists and cancer researchers, including Dr. John Bartlett from OICR, recently published revised clinical practice guidelines for HER2 testing in breast cancer to help improve clarity of HER2 test results.

Continue reading – New guidelines for HER2 testing in breast cancer

April 12, 2018

Restorative Breast Cancer Solution Start-Up Wins the 2018 FACIT Pitch Competition

Biotechnology competition modeled after popular TV program Dragons’ Den

TORONTO, ON (April 12, 2018) – A panel of investor-judges has selected Ontario-based oncology researcher Soror Sharifpoor of Polumiros Inc. as the winner of the 2018 FACIT Falcons’ Fortunes competition. The $50,000 award is intended to support further development of their innovative cancer research. FACIT runs the annual competition as part of its broader mandate to support translating research into Ontario companies to impact the lives of patients with cancer.

Now in its fifth year, the FACIT Falcons’ Fortunes competition is open to any Ontario-based oncology researcher (academics, research institutions, research hospitals and start-ups). Entrepreneurial scientists are invited to pitch innovative research ideas to a panel of four investors in a competition that is modeled after the popular CBC television program Dragons’ Den. The winners receive the $50,000 “Ernsting Entrepreneurship Award.” After follow-up technical evaluation of the underlying innovation, the money funds product development for one year.

Continue reading – Restorative Breast Cancer Solution Start-Up Wins the 2018 FACIT Pitch Competition

January 19, 2018

Scientists create method to sensitize triple-negative breast cancer to common immunotherapy

Drs. Marie-Claude Bourgeois-Daigneault and John Bell

Immunotherapy, which boosts the body’s immune system to kill cancer cells, has shown remarkable promise in treating many types of cancer. Now researchers have found a way to use immunotherapy against triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), one of the most lethal forms of breast cancer. Previously, TNBC was resistant to immune checkpoint inhibitors, a common class of immunotherapies. Using a new strategy, the scientists achieved a cure rate of up to 90 per cent in mouse models.

Continue reading – Scientists create method to sensitize triple-negative breast cancer to common immunotherapy

January 12, 2018

Large-scale study provides clearer picture of recurrence risk for ER-positive breast cancer

Dr. John Bartlett

Endocrine therapy uses hormone antagonists to greatly reduce the risk of disease recurrence in women with early-stage, estrogen-receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. However, the treatment can come with severe side effects. Around 30 per cent of women stop taking the therapy after three years largely due to these negative impacts. Usually patients receive the hormone therapy for five years following initial treatment (e.g., chemotherapy, surgery), but it can also be taken longer-term. A central question facing patients and clinicians is how to balance, in their decision making, the side effects of long-term treatment with the potential reduction in recurrence risk. In short, they want to know: ‘is it worth it?’ 

Continue reading – Large-scale study provides clearer picture of recurrence risk for ER-positive breast cancer

January 4, 2018

Study shows virus-boosted immunotherapy can be effective against aggressive breast cancer

The Maraba virus is seen under an electron microscope

Researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have found that a combination of two immunotherapies – oncolytic viruses and checkpoint inhibitors – was successful in treating triple-negative breast cancer in mouse models. Triple-negative breast cancer is the most aggressive and hard-to-treat form of the disease.

Continue reading – Study shows virus-boosted immunotherapy can be effective against aggressive breast cancer

November 2, 2017

Novel approach yields four robust biomarkers for breast cancer drug response

Dr. Benjamin Haibe-Kains and Zhaleh Safikhani pose for a photo

Biomarkers that can help predict a patient’s response to a given drug are central to testing new therapies in clinical trials as well as selecting which drugs to use in the clinic. Some of the biomarkers in use today rely on the overall expression of a given gene to predict if a drug will be of benefit. While these types of biomarkers have aided cancer research and treatment, a group led by Dr. Benjamin Haibe-Kains recently published research that is ushering in a new class of biomarkers – those based on gene isoforms (the different expression of the same gene within an individual). This work opens the door to more precise biomarkers.

Continue reading – Novel approach yields four robust biomarkers for breast cancer drug response

October 4, 2017

New software uses machine learning to identify mutations in tumours without reference tissue samples 

DNA sequence

One of the main steps in analyzing cancer genomic data is to find somatic mutations, which are non-hereditary changes in DNA that may give rise to cancer. To identify these mutations, researchers will often sequence the genome of a patient’s tumour as well as the genome of their normal tissue and compare the results. But what if normal tissue samples aren’t available?

Continue reading – New software uses machine learning to identify mutations in tumours without reference tissue samples 

August 9, 2017

Importance of large database of genetic variants reinforced in a new study

A newly published paper in Genetics in Medicine has reinforced the fundamental importance of collecting information about genetic variances in a single large database.  With so much important genetic information being used globally to understand the underlying genetic influences of diseases, researchers and clinicians need an accessible repository to share this information.

Continue reading – Importance of large database of genetic variants reinforced in a new study

August 17, 2016

Dr. John Bartlett discusses why new retrospective breast cancer study could lead to better diagnosis and treatment for patients

Fu Yan - In the lab.

OICR has announced a new retrospective study that will help to identify mutations for breast cancer, increasing understanding of the disease and potentially leading to better diagnosis in the future. The study is led by Dr. John Bartlett, Director of OICR’s Transformative Pathology Program and Dr. Harriet Feilotter, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen’s University. We spoke to Dr. Bartlett about why this study is important for the future of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. 

Continue reading – Dr. John Bartlett discusses why new retrospective breast cancer study could lead to better diagnosis and treatment for patients