November 2, 2017

Novel approach yields four robust biomarkers for breast cancer drug response

Dr. Benjamin Haibe-Kains and Zhaleh Safikhani pose for a photo

Biomarkers that can help predict a patient’s response to a given drug are central to testing new therapies in clinical trials as well as selecting which drugs to use in the clinic. Some of the biomarkers in use today rely on the overall expression of a given gene to predict if a drug will be of benefit. While these types of biomarkers have aided cancer research and treatment, a group led by Dr. Benjamin Haibe-Kains recently published research that is ushering in a new class of biomarkers – those based on gene isoforms (the different expression of the same gene within an individual). This work opens the door to more precise biomarkers.

Continue reading – Novel approach yields four robust biomarkers for breast cancer drug response

May 13, 2016

New research better defines which patients will respond to colorectal cancer drug

The University Health Network announced today that Dr. Geoffrey Liu, clinician-scientist at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, and his team have identified a blood marker that better defines which patients will respond to the drug cetuximab. The research applies to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

See Dr. Liu explain his findings:

Dr. Liu’s research was funded by the Ontario Institute of Cancer Research, the Alan B. Brown Chair in Molecular Genomics, the Cancer Care Ontario Chair in Experimental Therapeutics and Population Studies, the Canadian Cancer Society, and The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation. The research was published today in the journal Clinical Cancer Research.

See full release here:
Researchers Discover Blood Marker That Better Defines Who Will Respond To Drug Used In Metastatic Colorectal Cancer