July 27, 2020

Evolving treatment to evolving tumours: How OICR-supported researchers are getting ahead of ovarian cancer

OICR-supported Phase II trial uncovers how ovarian cancers become resistant to treatment, identifies new opportunities to personalize treatment for future patients

Clinician investigator Dr. Stephanie Lheureux has seen many women fight ovarian cancer – some who overcome the disease and unfortunately many who die. These women inspire Lheureux to find new effective treatments and to continue improving how we treat the disease.

One remarkable patient inspired the EVOLVE trial. After years of keeping her ovarian cancer in check, her cancer began to grow again, indicating that it had become resistant to the maintenance treatment she was on. Lheureux presented the option of palliative chemotherapy, as the latest guidelines suggest, but her patient declined – she wanted a different treatment that would allow her to have a healthy life outside of the hospital.

Dr. Stephanie Lheureux

“This type of chemotherapy requires several visits to the hospital and it’s associated with side effects on patients’ hair, skin and nails,” says Lheureux, Clinician Investigator at the University Health Network’s Princess Margaret Cancer Centre. “This patient didn’t want to go on standard chemotherapy. She had participated in several clinical trials before, and she urged me to find her another option.”

Continue reading – Evolving treatment to evolving tumours: How OICR-supported researchers are getting ahead of ovarian cancer

July 24, 2020

OICR research leads to new pancreatic cancer clinical trial with aim to change the standard of care for patients

New pancreatic cancer trial, NeoPancONE, launches across Canada

NeoPancONE

Adapted from Pancreatic Cancer Canada’s press release.

OICR’s PanCuRx team and collaborators have launched NeoPancONE, a Phase II clinical trial that will evaluate a potentially curative treatment strategy for operable pancreatic cancer. The trial, which is supported by Pancreatic Cancer Canada, will recruit patients at 10 cancer centres across the country to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of peri-operative chemotherapy – chemo treatment before and after surgery.

Typically, only 50 per cent of pancreatic cancer patients receive chemotherapy after surgery due to a range of personal and health reasons. NeoPancONE will help evaluate whether chemotherapy treatment before surgery can help extend the lives of these individuals.

Continue reading – OICR research leads to new pancreatic cancer clinical trial with aim to change the standard of care for patients

July 23, 2020

Prevention before treatment: How an OICR investigator is shifting the paradigm of chronic disease in Canada

The BETTER Program for chronic disease prevention and screening now customized for young adults, women and cancer survivors across the country

Dr. Eva Grunfeld

Cancer doctors are extensively trained to find and treat the disease, but what about preventing cancer in the first place?

Dr. Eva Grunfeld is dedicated to making prevention a priority.

In 2012, Grunfeld established the BETTER Program and today, this Canada-wide initiative is expanding and adapting to serve more individuals across the country.

Since its inception, BETTER has trained nearly 250 health professionals to become Prevention Practitioners who specialize in chronic disease prevention and screening. These Prevention Practitioners work in the primary care setting to develop personalized “prevention prescriptions” that are tailored to each patient based on an in-depth analysis of their medical history, family history, lifestyle factors, and other risk factors for diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer.

Continue reading – Prevention before treatment: How an OICR investigator is shifting the paradigm of chronic disease in Canada

July 21, 2020

OICR Drug Discovery awarded for COVID-19 research

OICR researchers and collaborators awarded $520,000 in new funding for COVID-19 drug discovery project

Dr. Gennady Poda
Dr. Gennady Poda, OICR Scientific Advisor and Group Leader

OICR Scientific Advisor and Group Leader, Dr. Gennady Poda, and collaborators at Sunnybrook Research Institute have been awarded $520,000 to identify new therapeutics and existing drugs that could be repurposed for the treatment of COVID-19. This award, which was announced on July 17 by Premier Doug Ford, is part of the Government of Ontario’s $20 million COVID-19 Rapid Research Fund.

Using OICR supercomputers and advanced computational chemistry techniques, Poda and collaborators aim to identify drugs that can stop the virus from replicating in the body by targeting the virus’ key polymerase enzyme, RdRP.

“We’ll be looking for new potential drugs to treat the COVID-19 infections by rapidly identifying approved drugs and compounds that are in clinical trials that could inhibit RdRP,” says Poda. “We will advance the most promising compounds into preclinical animal models and, if the data is promising, into patients.”

Continue reading – OICR Drug Discovery awarded for COVID-19 research

July 8, 2020

Protecting cancer patients from COVID-19: world-first clinical trial tests a novel immune-boosting strategy

Dr. Rebecca Auer with colleague. Credit: The Ottawa Hospital

In the race to find new ways to prevent and treat COVID-19, OICR-supported researchers have launched an innovative clinical trial focussed on strengthening the immune system for one of the most vulnerable populations – cancer patients.

The trial involves IMM-101, a preparation of safe, heat-killed bacteria that broadly stimulates the innate, or “first-response,” arm of the immune system. The researchers hope that boosting cancer patients’ immune systems with IMM-101 will protect them from developing severe COVID-19 and other dangerous lung infections.

Researchers from The Ottawa Hospital came up with the idea for the trial and worked with the Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG) at Queen’s University to design and run it in centres across the country. Funding and in-kind support, valued at $2.8 million, is being provided by the Canadian Cancer Society, BioCanRx, the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, The Ottawa Hospital Foundation, The Ottawa Hospital Academic Medical Organization, ATGen Canada/NKMax, and Immodulon Therapeutics, the manufacturer of IMM-101.

“An effective vaccine that provides specific protection against COVID-19 could take another year or more to develop, test, and implement,” says Dr. Rebecca Auer, study lead, surgical oncologist and Director of Cancer Research at The Ottawa Hospital and associate professor at the University of Ottawa. “In the meantime, there is an urgent need to protect people with cancer from severe COVID-19 infection, and we think this immune stimulator, IMM-101, may be able to do this.”

“This trial could support an important change to the standard of care for cancer patients by administration of IMM-101 prior to starting cancer treatment,” says Dr. John Bell, Senior Scientist at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Scientific Director of BioCanRx and co-lead of OICR’s Immuno-oncology Translational Research Intitiative. “Accelerating to the clinic, biotherapeutics that can enhance the quality of life of those living with cancer.”

The trial, called CCTG IC.8, has been approved by Health Canada and is expected to open at cancer centres across Canada this summer. People who are interested in participating should speak with their cancer specialist.

“OICR is excited to be collaborating on such a landmark clinical trial supporting cancer patients in this unprecedented time,” says Dr. Laszlo Radvanyi, President and Scientific Director, OICR. “IMM-101 may be an effective approach to protect our vulnerable patients not only against COVID-19, but also to boost their immune system to fight cancer.”

Read the full release.

June 29, 2020

New radiotherapy method improves long-term survival

OICR Investigator-led phase II clinical trial shows long-term advantage of ablative therapy for patients with multiple tumours. Technology enters phase III clinical testing.

Varian TruBeam®
© 2010 Varian Medical Systems International AG, All Rights Reserved

For a long time, if a cancer had spread to another part of a patient’s body, it was thought to be incurable. Dr. David Palma and collaborators are challenging this notion.

In the phase II SABR-COMET clinical trial, Palma and colleagues evaluated the long-term effects of a modern type of radiotherapy, called stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), on individuals with cancers that have spread to a few organs. The results from the trial, which were recently published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, show that SABR can extend the lives of these patients by a median of 22 months with an improvement in five-year survival of 25 per cent.

Continue reading – New radiotherapy method improves long-term survival

June 26, 2020

Opening the virtual floodgates for cancer research and discovery

OICR’s Genome Informatics team announces international release of the ICGC-ARGO Data Platform, the all-in-one data hub for the largest clinical-genomic data sharing initiative in the world

Dr. Christina Yung

We’re in the midst of an era of big data that is changing the way we understand the world – including how we study, diagnose and treat cancers. 

Improvements in sequencing technology and computational power have allowed us to collect massive amounts of information about cancer patients and their tumours. This information, however, is only powerful if it can be accessed by those who can transform big data into new discoveries. 

Over the last decade, OICR’s Genome Informatics has built a reputation for developing robust big data portals that provide cancer data access to thousands of researchers around the world. Now, the Genome Informatics team has set out to do it again – this time with bigger data. 

Continue reading – Opening the virtual floodgates for cancer research and discovery

June 25, 2020

CanPath Awarded $2.1 million CIHR Grant for SUPPORT-Canada COVID-19 Initiative

The SUPPORT-Canada initiative will capture data and biospecimens in order to identify factors contributing to COVID-19 susceptibility, severity and outcomes.

Dr. Philip Awadalla

CanPath (the Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow’s Health), co-led by OICR Investigator Dr. Philip Awadalla, has been awarded a $2.1 million grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) through their COVID-19 Rapid Research Funding competition. The initiative, titled SUrveying Prospective Population cOhorts for COVID-19 pRevalence and ouTcomes in Canada (SUPPORT-Canada),aims to capture data and biospecimens to enable population-level surveillance. SUPPORT-Canada will enable researchers and clinicians to find factors contributing to COVID-19 susceptibility, severity and outcomes, thus identifying factors predisposing individuals or communities across Canada to a high risk of infection.

“The integration of clinical programs with our broader existing population cohort infrastructure creates the opportunity to rapidly assess patterns across Canada, while discovering and tracking critical biological and environmental determinants of disease susceptibility and severity for COVID-19,” says Awadalla, who is the lead Principal Investigator for the SUPPORT-Canada Initiative and National Scientific Director of CanPath.

Continue reading – CanPath Awarded $2.1 million CIHR Grant for SUPPORT-Canada COVID-19 Initiative

June 24, 2020

Philanthropic donation moves The Alex U. Soyka Pancreatic Cancer Research Project: An International Partnership into Phase II

Ontario-Israel collaboration to explore personalized treatment and improved diagnostics for pancreatic cancer

Group of logos

Toronto – (June 24, 2020) A second significant multi-year commitment from Sylvia M. G. Soyka, Director, and the Alex U. Soyka Foundation to the Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (CFHU) will allow researchers from the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR), the Hebrew University’s Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC) and Sheba Medical Center to conduct The Alex U. Soyka Pancreatic Cancer Research Project: Phase II – An International Partnership (Soyka Project).

Phase II builds upon the outstanding achievements of Phase I of the Soyka Project by fostering further collaboration between Israeli and Ontario researchers, focusing on three main research avenues in pancreatic cancer – to develop effective patient-specific treatment courses, address the challenges of tumour cell heterogeneity and create new methods for early-stage diagnosis.

As a measure of its impact so far, Phase I of the Soyka Project has been cited in more than 18 peer-reviewed papers on pancreatic cancer including manuscripts in the prestigious journals Nature Genetics, Nature Medicine and Cancer Cell.  Phase II of the Soyka Project will provide eight of Israel’s leading cancer researchers with funds to explore the molecular origins of pancreatic cancer, as well as novel diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic approaches. These fellowships are key to the multi-disciplinary approach of the Soyka Project and this round of funding will see new scientists joining the team with expertise in single-cell RNA sequencing and bioinformatics, some of the most advanced approaches used in cancer research today.

A central component of Phase II is to increase the opportunity for patients at the Sheba Medical Center in Israel to be molecularly profiled according to the COMPASS clinical trial guidelines. COMPASS is a world-leading initiative led by Dr. Steven Gallinger, supported by OICR and based at the University Health Network in Toronto, that uses genomic and transcriptomic information from patient tumours to personalize treatment with the aim of improving outcomes. The data collected through COMPASS will also be used by Soyka Project scientists to dig deep into the inner workings of pancreatic cancer.

“I feel proud and privileged to fund Phase II of this international collaboration in pancreatic cancer research,” says Sylvia M. G. Soyka. “In the world of cancer research, much progress has been made in recent years, but pancreatic cancer remains a deadly disease with a dismal less than 10% five-year survival rate. When we started Phase I in 2014, the five-year survival rate was less than 5%, but there is clearly a long way to go. In 2010, my father, a man fully engaged in every aspect of life who took great pains to look after his health, the sort of person who was going to live well forever, was diagnosed out of the blue and died three months to the day later. The Soyka Project is his legacy. Phase I was highly successful, in no small part due to the collaboration of the dedicated scientists, within and between the teams, which created new directions. In the context of today’s world, I feel strongly that the fact of the collaboration alone, which requires both trust and generosity of spirit, sets an important example which should be emulated. The rewards of Phase II will be ours as well as theirs.”

“I am extremely thankful to Sylvia Soyka for her generous funding of this cutting-edge research program. Pancreatic cancer is notoriously difficult to detect and treat and patients need better options,” says Dr. Laszlo Radvanyi, President and Scientific Director, OICR. “The Soyka Project is an incredible example of the benefits of international scientific collaboration that will reveal important insights into detecting pancreatic cancer earlier and developing precision medicine tools for improved treatment. We are thrilled to continue this important work with our partners in Israel.”

“Sylvia Soyka is the driving force and inspiration behind The Alex U. Soyka Pancreatic Cancer Research Project that started six years ago and now, her recent generous donation will allow the second phase of research,” says Prof. Haya Lorberboum-Galski, Chair of IMRIC. “Her longstanding support is of vast importance to the researchers at IMRIC as it will enable us to continue our ongoing endeavour to decipher the basic molecular aspects of one of the deadliest cancers – pancreatic cancer. We hope this exciting work, in collaboration with OICR, will lead to new approaches for early diagnosis, prevention, treatment and a cure.”

“Sylvia Soyka is an exemplary philanthropic leader who decided to tackle one of the most challenging and underfunded cancers,” says Rami Kleinmann, President and CEO of CFHU. “Together with an outstanding team of researchers and practitioners from Canada and Israel, she managed to help make substantial progress in understanding the disease. We hope that with the current funding of Phase II, we will be able to take it even further.”

About The Alex U. Soyka Pancreatic Cancer Research Project: Phase II – An International Partnership (Soyka Project)

Alex U. Soyka was a committed supporter of the Hebrew University through the CFHU in Montreal. Following his death from pancreatic cancer in 2010, his daughter Sylvia M. G. Soyka, Director, and the Alex U. Soyka Foundation, made a multi-year funding commitment to CFHU to launch The Alex U. Soyka Pancreatic Cancer Research Project.

About the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR)
OICR is a collaborative, not-for-profit research institute funded by the Government of Ontario. We conduct and enable high-impact translational cancer research to accelerate the development of discoveries for patients around the world while maximizing the economic benefit of this research for the people of Ontario. For more information visit https://oicr.on.ca/

About the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC)

The Institute conducts basic and translational/precision research in the field of biomedicine with a main focus on cancer research. The Institute scientists work in a multidisciplinary enterprise that is essential for understanding most of the diseases that currently challenge medical science, including cancer, for the benefit of patients all over the world. For more information visit https://medicine.ekmd.huji.ac.il/En/academicUnits/imric/Pages/Default.aspx

About the Canadian Friends of Hebrew University (CFHU)

CFHU facilitates academic and research partnerships between Canada and Israel, as well as establishes scholarships, supports research and cultivates student and faculty exchanges. Albert Einstein, Martin Buber, Chaim Weizmann and Sigmund Freud were among the university’s founders whose genius inspired a university without limits or borders. CFHU is dedicated to supporting Hebrew University in its efforts to remain one of the most innovative learning institutions in the world.

OICR media contact
Christopher Needles
Director, Communications
Ontario Institute for Cancer Research
416-319-5252
christopher.needles@oicr.on.ca

CFHU media contact
Robert Sarner
Senior National Director, Communication
Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University
416-485-8000, Ext. 111
rsarner@cfhu.org

June 23, 2020

FACIT backs made-in-Ontario data science and medtech innovations through Prospects Oncology Fund

Group of logos

Replica Analytics & Sunnybrook’s Czarnota Lab receive key seed funding to de-risk Ontario intellectual property

TORONTO, ON (June 23, 2020) – FACIT, a commercialization venture firm, announced the newest recipients of Ontario First seed capital through the latest round of its Prospects Oncology Fund: Ottawa-based data science start-up Replica Analytics Ltd., and medtech innovator Dr. Greg Czarnota of Toronto’s Sunnybrook Research Institute.

Replica Analytics Ltd. is a new venture created by Dr. Khaled El Emam, a serial entrepreneur whose previous venture, FACIT-backed Privacy Analytics, was acquired by IMS Health. Replica Analytics is developing modeling software to create synthetic data based on real clinical datasets. High quality synthetic data is increasingly sought after by researchers, the pharmaceutical industry, and other entrepreneurs who require the datasets to build new models and enable AI innovation in healthcare.

Continue reading – FACIT backs made-in-Ontario data science and medtech innovations through Prospects Oncology Fund

June 23, 2020

Diagnosing brain tumours with a blood test

A blood test to diagnose and classify tumours could be revolutionary and practice-changing for patients and clinicians alike. In many cases, a simple blood sample could take the place of more invasive surgery to obtain tissue samples – resulting in better treatment planning and less anxiety for patients.

University Health Network’s (UHN) Drs. Daniel De Carvalho and Gelareh Zadeh collaborated to combine advanced technology with machine learning to develop a highly sensitive and accurate blood test to detect and classify brain cancers. Photo Credit: UHN

In an OICR-supported study recently published in Nature Medicine, researchers have shown that a simple but sensitive blood test can accurately diagnose and classify different types of brain tumours. With further research and development, the test could serve as a less-invasive method to detect, diagnose and classify the severity of brain tumours.

The study was also presented virtually on June 22 at the Opening Plenary Session of the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2020: Turning Science into Lifesaving Care.

Continue reading – Diagnosing brain tumours with a blood test

June 17, 2020

Inside OICR’s Drug Discovery Lab: A graduate student’s unique collaborative experience

An open-science brain cancer drug development initiative makes for a memorable master’s experience

Deeba Ensan

Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a complex, lethal and inoperable type of childhood brain cancer with a median survival of less than a year from diagnosis. Not only is DIPG difficult to treat, it is also extremely rare, making it a particularly challenging disease to study. Given this challenge, those studying DIPG have come together from around the world to find new solutions together.

When University of Toronto master’s student Deeba Ensan heard that OICR was contributing to DIPG research, she was eager to help. Over the last two years, Ensan has made considerable progress towards a new drug for DIPG.

Continue reading – Inside OICR’s Drug Discovery Lab: A graduate student’s unique collaborative experience
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