March 2, 2020

Study reveals roots of leukemia that current chemotherapies can’t reach

John Dick

Researchers find the roots of leukemia relapse are present at diagnosis, uncovering clues to new treatment approaches

Despite significant advances in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the disease often returns aggressively in many patients after treatment. It is thought that current chemotherapies eliminate most leukemia cells, but groups of resistant cells may survive therapy, progress and eventually cause relapse. Dr. John Dick and collaborators have found these cells.

In a recent study published in Cancer Discovery, Dick and collaborators were able to identify and isolate groups of genetically distinct cells that drive ALL relapse.

The cells, termed diagnosis relapse initiating (dRI) clones were found to have genetic characteristics that differ from the other leukemia cells that are eliminated by treatment.

The study, along with a complementary study published in Blood Cancer Discovery, unraveled the genetic, epigenetic, metabolic and pro-survival molecular pathways driving treatment resistance. Together, these papers provide an integrated genomic and functional approach to describing the underlying genetics and mechanisms of relapse for ALL.

Interestingly, the research group discovered that dRI clones are present at diagnosis, opening opportunities to improve treatment up-front, devise drugs that target these resistant cells and prevent relapse from ever occurring.

Dr. Stephanie Dobson

“Our study has shown that genetic clones that contribute to disease recurrence already possess characteristics such as therapeutic tolerance that distinguish them from other clones at diagnosis,” says Dr. Stephanie Dobson, first author of the study who performed this research as a member of John Dick’s Lab. “Being able to isolate these clones at diagnosis, sometimes years prior to disease recurrence, has enabled us to begin to profile the properties allowing these particular cells to survive and act as reservoirs for relapse. This knowledge can be used to enhance our therapeutic approaches for targeting relapse and relapse-fated cells.”

“Xenografting added considerable new insight into the evolutionary fates and patterns of subclones obtained from diagnosis samples,” says John Dick, who is the co-senior author of the study, Senior Scientist at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and leader of OICR’s Acute Leukemia Translational Research Initiative. “We were able to gather extensive information about the genetics of the subclones from our models, which helped us describe the trajectories of each subclone and the order in which they acquired mutations.”

Ordering these mutations relied on the advanced machine learning algorithms designed by Dr. Quaid Morris and Jeff Wintersinger at the University of Toronto.

Research efforts are underway to build on these discoveries and determine how to block dRI clones.

The study was led by researchers at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and the University of Toronto and supported in part by OICR’s Acute Leukemia Translational Research Initiative.

This post has been adapted from the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital news release.

February 18, 2020

Tackling brain cancer from all angles

Dr. Jüri Reimand

The Terry Fox Research Institute (TFRI) announced today that Dr. Jüri Reimand, OICR Investigator, has been granted the Terry Fox New Investigator Award to support his research into the evolution of glioblastoma, a deadly brain cancer that often recurs after treatment, with no long-term cure.

“This is a terrible disease with a dismal prognosis. It is usually fatal within a year or two after diagnosis and current therapies mostly fail to halt its recurrence and progress,” says Reimand. “We are taking a data-driven approach to see if we can change the tide on this disease by mapping the evolutionary history of each tumor and identifying genes and pathways that could be targeted through new or existing drugs.”

Backed by TFRI support, Reimand and collaborators are creating a robust multi-omics dataset derived from samples of glioblastoma tumours, including those that have returned after initial treatment. The dataset will incorporate many types of layered data from each sample including whole genome sequencing data, RNA sequencing data and proteomic data.

Reimand, who has expertise in integrating complex datasets, will develop machine learning strategies to identify new potential targets for treatment. The tools and methodologies will be designed to be applicable to other cancer types and will be made freely available for the research community to use.

“We hope that our expertise in computational biology can help shed new light on glioblastoma recurrence by analyzing tens of thousands of genes, proteins and RNAs in complex interaction networks, and ultimately provide a small number of high-confidence targets for further experimental work and therapy development,” said Reimand.

This research is enabled in large part by Reimand’s partnership with Dr. Sheila Singh, a clinician-scientist at McMaster University in Hamilton.

“We are routinely generating large amounts of complementary data utilizing different platforms that are difficult to compare,” says Dr. Singh. “This is why we are so excited to collaborate with Dr. Reimand to decipher GBM recurrence, as he brings invaluable expertise in computational biology, bioinformatics and machine learning. Dr. Reimand’s multi-omics integrative analysis will deliver our PPG with target genes, pathways and drug interactions that will help us to identify new therapies and understand the complex mechanisms of GBM recurrence.”

Read more about Dr. Jüri Reimand’s work.

This post has been adapted from the original announcement made by TFRI.

February 5, 2020

Whole-genome analysis generates new insights into viruses involved in cancer

Dr. Ivan Borozan

OICR researchers scan more than 2,600 whole cancer genomes for traces of known and potentially unknown cancer-causing viruses, identifying new ways that these pathogens may eventually lead to the disease

It is estimated that viruses cause nearly 10 per cent of all cancers. These cancer-causing viruses – also known as oncoviruses – can make changes to normal cells that may eventually lead to the disease. As researchers better understand how oncoviruses cause cancer, they can develop new therapies and vaccines to prevent them from doing so.

In the most extensive exploration of cancer genomes to date, OICR researchers and collaborators discovered new insights into the mechanisms behind the seven known oncoviruses, and provided strong evidence that there are no other human cancer-causing viruses in existence.

Their study was published today in Nature Genetics, alongside more than 20 related publications from the Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes Project, also known as the Pan-Cancer Project or PCAWG. The research group analyzed whole genome data from more than 2,600 patient tumours representing 35 different tumour types.

“The Pan-Cancer Project is one of the largest cancer genome projects to date,” says Dr. Ivan Borozan, Scientific Associate at OICR and leading co-author of the study. “This project allowed us to search for viruses in the most comprehensive collection of cancer genomes using the latest and most advanced techniques. To analyze this extensive dataset, we first had to develop computational tools and analysis pipelines that can efficiently process large-scale sequencing data and – at the same time – extract accurate information about minute amounts of the viral genome present in each individual sample. The results generated using these tools were then integrated to decipher molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of cancer.”

Our research points towards a future where these cancers can be treated more effectively, and potentially prevented in the first place.
– Dr. Ivan Borozan

The group discovered that an individual’s immune system, while trying to protect itself from a certain strain of the well-known human papillomavirus (HPV), may cause damage to normal DNA that lead to the development of bladder, head, neck and cervical cancers.

The study also found that the hepatitis B virus (HBV), which is linked to some liver cancers, causes damage in normal cells by integrating into human DNA close to TERT, a well-understood cancer-driving gene.

Spinoffs of this research initiative have led to important discoveries about the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) and how it can promote the development of stomach cancer.

“These findings can help us develop new vaccines or therapies that target these mechanisms,” says Borozan. “Our research points towards a future where these cancers can be treated more effectively, and potentially prevented in the first place.”

As new sequencing research initiatives emerge, the research group’s computational tools and pipelines – which are available for the research community to use – will help further explain the mechanisms behind this complex disease.


Related links

February 5, 2020

Dr. Lincoln Stein talks about the Pan-Cancer Project

An overview of the Pan-Cancer Project with Dr. Lincoln Stein.


Watch more Pan-Cancer Project videos


Related links

February 5, 2020

TrackSig: Unlocking the history of cancer

Yulia Rubanova
Yulia Rubanova

Toronto-based machine learning experts map the changes that lead to cancer, revealing opportunities for earlier diagnosis and new approaches to outmaneuver the disease

A tumour is often made up of different cells, some of which have changed – or evolved – over time and gained the ability to grow faster, survive longer and potentially avoid treatment. These cells, which have an ‘evolutionary advantage’, are thought to cause the vast majority of cancer deaths but researchers now have a new tool to tackle tumour evolution: TrackSig.

TrackSig – which was developed by Dr. Quaid Morris and his team at the University of Toronto, the Vector Institute and OICR – is a novel computational method that can map a cancer’s evolutionary history from a single patient sample and in turn help researchers thwart the disease’s next move.

“We combined sequencing with evolutionary theory and mathematical modeling to understand how cancers develop and adapt to resist treatment,” says Yulia Rubanova, PhD Candidate in the Morris Lab and lead author of the study. “This understanding lays the foundation for us to be able to predict – and impede – tumour evolution in future cancer patients.”

This understanding lays the foundation for us to be able to predict – and impede – tumour evolution in future cancer patients
– Yulia Rubanova

TrackSig was published today in Nature Communications alongside nearly two dozen other publications in Nature and its affiliated journals related to the Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes Project, also known as the Pan-Cancer Project or PCAWG.

Previous tumour evolution studies focused on identifying the most frequent changes – or mutations – in a patient sample, where the most common mutations represent changes that came earlier in the tumour’s development and less common mutations represent more recent changes. Instead, Morris’ TrackSig charts different types of mutations over time, generating maps of a tumour’s evolutionary history in finer detail and with better accuracy than ever before.

This level of resolution enabled the discovery that many cancer-causing genetic changes occur long before the disease is diagnosed.

“For exceptional cases like in certain ovarian cancers, we were able to see these early events happening 10 to 20 years before the patient has any symptoms,” says Dr. Lincoln Stein, Head of Adaptive Oncology at OICR and member of the Pan-Cancer Project Steering Committee. “This opens up a much larger window of opportunity for earlier detection and treatment than we thought possible.”

The tools and findings from the Pan-Cancer Project are changing the way we think about cancer
Dr. Quaid Morris

With their new detailed maps of tumour evolution, the research group plans to further investigate novel cancer treatment strategies and design new therapies that can better anticipate, prevent and overcome evolution and drug resistance.

“The tools and findings from the Pan-Cancer Project are changing the way we think about cancer,” says Morris. “We’ve uncovered new opportunities to improve diagnosis and treatment, and we’ll continue to strive towards getting the best treatment to patients at the right time.”

TrackSig is freely available for the research community to use at https://github.com/morrislab/TrackSig.


Related links

December 6, 2019

Pin-pointing prostate cancer: Bringing MRI-guided biopsies to men across Ontario

Dr. Laurence Klotz of the Sunnybrook Research Institute
Dr. Laurence Klotz, urologic surgeon and researcher at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre.

OICR-funded clinical trial shows value in advanced biopsy techniques for men with low-risk prostate cancer

Many of the 23,000 men across Canada who will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year won’t need aggressive treatment. Instead, men with low-risk or slow-growing cancers may be offered ‘active surveillance’, where their healthcare team monitors their cancer closely with regular tests, scans and biopsies. Dr. Laurence Klotz, a world leader in active surveillance, is working to improve how surgeons in Ontario and across Canada perform these important prostate biopsies.

Klotz, who is a leading urologic surgeon and researcher at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, teamed up with collaborators in London, Hamilton, Kitchener and Toronto to bring the latest MRI-guided prostate biopsy techniques to patients across the province. With OICR’s support, they evaluated the use of MRI-targeted biopsies, where a surgeon uses MRI images to help guide biopsy needles, relative to traditional biopsies, and found that the use of MRI results in 50 per cent fewer failures of surveillance. The findings from their two-year study were recently published in European Urology.

“As shown in other countries like the U.K. and Australia, using MRI before biopsies can reduce the diagnosis of insignificant cancers, selectively find aggressive cancers and reduce the number of false negatives,” says Klotz. “Our study showed that using MRI allows us to better pinpoint prostate cancers as they progress.”

Learnings from this study have helped inform the design of a new trial, called PRECISE, that is evaluating whether MRI can replace biopsies and spare some men from the associated side effects. Results from PRECISE will be submitted for publication in the next few months.

“We’ve laid the groundwork for better prostate cancer diagnosis,” says Klotz. “This means we’re one step closer to ensuring each man receives the most appropriate treatment for his individual cancer.”

Read more about PRECISE.

November 21, 2019

Researchers teach hand-held DNA sequencing devices to read a new language

Paul Tang, Computational Biologist, and Philip Zuzarte, Scientific Associate pose for a photo at OICR headquarters.
Paul Tang, Computational Biologist, and Dr. Philip Zuzarte, Scientific Associate pose for a photo at OICR headquarters. Tang and Zuzarte were central to OICR’s contributions to the study.

International research group unlocks the promise of nanopore native RNA sequencing

Studying RNA may offer new answers to cancer – and the tools to read RNA directly are now in our hands.

An international research consortium, led in part by Dr. Jared Simpson at OICR, has developed new laboratory protocols and a suite of software tools that will allow the research community to exploit the promise of direct RNA sequencing.

Dr. Jared Simpson, OICR Investigator.

These techniques, published recently in Nature Methods, represent the first large-scale exploration of human RNA using nanopore sequencers – the advanced handheld sequencing devices that can read long strands of RNA.

“Unlike traditional sequencing devices that read copies of RNA strands that are cut into little pieces, nanopore sequencing allows us to study long strands of RNA directly without losing important information in the copying and cutting process,” says Paul Tang, Computational Biologist at OICR and co-first author of the publication. “Our methods combine the power of reading RNA directly with the power of long-read sequencing, enabling an entirely novel way to study cancer biology.”

In collaboration with researchers at Johns Hopkins University and the University of California Santa Cruz, Tang and Simpson developed the software methods that could decode the output data from a nanopore sequencer. Their methods used a machine learning technique, called a Hidden Markov Model, to determine the letters of code within an RNA strand.

“With these methods, we’ve shown that you can leverage nanopore RNA sequencing to gain a lot of valuable information that we couldn’t have otherwise,” Tang says. “We’re very happy to see this work published because we are enabling others to study a new aspect of cancer biology and we look forward to the research discoveries to come.”

These new methods have been integrated into Simpson’s already-popular nanopolish software suite which is routinely used by the nanopore community around the world.

Read more about Simpson’s work in our 2018-2019 Annual Report.

November 13, 2019

Winning presentation points to more personalized medicine at OMPRN Pathology Matters meeting

OICR and OMPRN leaders pose for a photo with students and fellows who presented at the fourth annual Pathology Matters meeting in Ottawa.

Dr. Brian Keller, an Anatomical Pathology Resident from Ottawa, was one of those recognized for outstanding presentations and innovative research at this year’s Pathology Matters meeting

Through his years of research training, Dr. Brian Keller developed expertise in culturing cancer cells. Under precise conditions in a controlled lab environment, he could take a part of a patient’s tumour and grow it into an experimental model for further research. Keller would study these models to find new treatments for future cancer patients, but he wondered if these models could also help patients today.

While he was an MD/PhD trainee, he received a patient’s sample that was unique. It defied the typical behaviour of a sample and grew remarkably well, faster than normal, exhibiting the cancerous traits that could make it an excellent experimental model.

The sample came from a patient with advanced melanoma whose disease had returned after multiple rounds of treatment. Keller recognized the opportunity to help.

Dr. Brian Keller

“This patient was in a very difficult situation,” says Keller, who is now an Anatomical Pathology Resident at The Ottawa Hospital. “The standard treatments weren’t working and the patient’s oncologist was thinking of second- and third-line treatment options. Knowing that we had this model in the lab, we thought that we could potentially find a better treatment option if we looked at hundreds of available drugs.”

Keller mobilized the patient’s healthcare team around his idea to find new possible treatment options for the patient. He worked with the patient’s pathologist, medical oncologist, molecular geneticist, laboratory and research technicians, and several other graduate students to grow the tumour sample, analyze its DNA and test approximately 1,200 available drugs on it. Their results aligned with the oncologist’s clinical decision and the patient had an impressive response to treatment, Keller says.

“Every cancer is unique and we’re working towards getting the right treatments to the right patients at the right time,” says Keller. “This represents the direction in which our field is moving. I am hopeful that our generation of clinicians and healthcare providers can help bring more personalized and effective treatment to our patients.”

Keller went on to characterize the patient’s disease and found that it had a unique mutation in the BRAF gene that had never been modeled before. This novel experimental model will continue to serve as a research tool in Dr. John Bell’s lab at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, where Keller performed his research, and throughout the global scientific community. The team has made the model available through the American Type Culture Collection’s general repository and a manuscript of the case is under preparation.

“I am fortunate to have had the opportunity to train in Dr. Bell’s lab, where exploration and collaboration are strongly encouraged,” Keller says. “Without exploration, we cannot make discoveries, and without collaboration, we cannot bring our discoveries to our patients.”

Keller presented his findings at the fourth annual Pathology Matters meeting in early October, hosted by the Ontario Molecular Pathology Research Network (OMPRN). His story won him an Outstanding Presentation Award. Other presentation award recipients included:

  • Dr. Lina Chen, Anatomical Pathology Resident, Queen’s University
  • Christina Ferrone, PhD Candidate, Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen’s University
  • Chelsea Jackson, PhD Candidate, Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen’s University

OICR would like to congratulate award recipients and thank the organizing committee for a successful meeting.

Learn more about the OMPRN

October 8, 2019

OICR welcomes new Clinician-Scientist, Dr. Tricia Cottrell

Dr. Tricia Cottrell, OICR Clinician-Scientist.

OICR is proud to welcome Dr. Tricia Cottrell to Ontario’s cancer research community.

Dr. Tricia Cottrell, who is an immunologist and pathologist by training, is focused on the interplay between cancer cells and the immune system. She maps these complex interactions, as patients undergo treatment, to develop new biomarkers that can better predict the course of a patient’s disease.

Joining OICR from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD, Cottrell brings unique expertise in studying the tumour immune microenvironment, specifically in lung cancer. Here, she discusses her transition and her new appointments at the Canadian Cancer Trials Group, Queen’s University and OICR.

How did you become interested in the field of immuno-oncology?

The idea of harnessing the immune system to control and eliminate cancer fascinates me.

My PhD research on the autoimmune disease scleroderma left me eager to find ways to study immune responses in human tissue. While pursuing this research through my anatomic pathology residency, I stumbled upon the revolution happening in cancer immunotherapy. There are a lot of interesting intersections between cancer immunology and autoimmunity, and I knew I wanted to dig in.

What problems and questions are you working to solve?

Generally, I look at different features of the immune response to cancer and find patterns in these features that are associated with a response to therapy. I’m addressing the question: can we predict which patients are most likely to respond to treatment?

When we have tools to answer that question, we can help patients decide which treatment is best suited for their unique disease.

How are you addressing those big questions?

As a pathologist, I start with simple observations made through a microscope. Then, I use techniques like multiplex immunofluorescence to understand the cells and molecules driving the patterns I see in the tissue. Finally, I integrate these observations with other –omics analyses of the same sample, like DNA or RNA profiling, in pursuit of better biomarkers. The ultimate goal is to have biomarkers that can accurately predict which therapy or combination of therapies is most likely to empower a patient’s immune system to eliminate their cancer.

Through these studies, we also identify patterns and molecular characteristics in the tumours of patients who respond poorly to treatment. We can use this knowledge to find mechanisms of resistance, or the ways that the cancer can evade treatment. Then we can develop new therapies to address these mechanisms.

You’ve been recognized and awarded for your research on several occasions. What is an achievement that most people don’t know about?

I never anticipated that my research as a pathologist would lead me to analyzing big data. I’m quite proud that I learned some computer programming and I continue to integrate new technologies and cutting-edge analytic approaches into my research.

A specific achievement I am proud of is developing a method to measure the response of lung cancer patients to checkpoint blockade therapy using microscopic features of their tumours. This method is now being validated in a large clinical trial and has been shown to work in other cancer types as well. We are currently investigating its potential as a pan-tumour biomarker that would allow unprecedented standardization of clinical trials across different cancer types.

Why did you choose to relocate to Kingston?

I was looking for an opportunity to expand my research focusing on patients enrolled in clinical trials. Kingston offered that opportunity through an appointment with the Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG), which is based at Queen’s University where I am also an Assistant Professor.

At CCTG, I get to participate in the design of clinical trials, including arranging tissue collection and planning the correlative science (the study of the relationship between biology and clinical outcomes) that goes along with those trials. My goal is to make sure my research will be translatable to the clinic, or in other words – to find solutions that can be applied in practice.

I’m also personally very excited about the opportunity for my family to be here in Canada.

What are you looking forward to over the next year?

I look forward to maintaining my existing collaborations while broadening my research scope. I’ll be working to establish a laboratory-based platform that produces high-quality, large-scale multiplex immunofluorescence data from tumour tissue specimens. I also look forward to laying the groundwork for a data integration and analysis pipeline for tissue-based immunology studies.

Most of all, I’m excited to begin growing my own lab group. I hope to foster a collaborative team environment with individuals from diverse backgrounds in pathology, biology, immunology, bioinformatics and more.

Read more about Dr. Tricia Cottrell here.

September 30, 2019

OICR Annual Report 2018/19

We are pleased to present the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR) Annual Report for 2018/19.

Translating cancer research means bringing the best research discoveries to patients, and it’s at the heart of the work we do. OICR collaborates with researchers across Ontario and around the world to ensure Ontario’s most significant cancer research discoveries have maximum impact for patients and the province’s economy. This report highlights a selection of OICR’s many translational research successes over the last year, including: 

  • An unprecedented investigation into the dark matter of the human cancer genome, which discovered the causes of two thirds of cancers that were previously unexplained;
  • A study that’s bringing next generation genomic sequencing to five Ontario cancer centres, helping match patients to targeted therapies and accelerating cancer research;
  • Developing new software technologies to help bring portable nanopore sequencing into cancer research and care;
  • A pan-Canadian initiative changing the landscape of lung cancer radiotherapy clinical trials and providing more treatment options to patients;
  • The scientific and business excellence of Fusion Pharma Inc., which is developing innovative medical isotopes for treating cancer with reduced side effects.

We hope you enjoy learning more about OICR’s many achievements over the past year and we welcome your feedback at info@oicr.on.ca.

Read the report

September 18, 2019

When the tools you need don’t exist, create them

Dr. Ina Anreiter joins OICR as a Schmidt Fellow, bringing her background in behavioural genetics to bioinformatics

While writing her doctoral thesis, Dr. Ina Anreiter realized that there was a missing piece to her research. What she didn’t realize was that this missing piece would lead her into a prestigious postdoctoral fellowship in an entirely new scientific discipline. For decades, scientists have known that RNA – often referred to as DNA’s cousin – undergoes chemical modifications before running its course. These modifications, like RNA methylation, have an important effect in cancer cells, but without the tools to study RNA modifications, progress in this field had stalled for many years.

Recently, the study of these modifications – also known as the field of “epitranscriptomics” – has garnered new attention as the research community develops new methods to study RNA. These methods, Anreiter says, still rely on common chemistry lab techniques and cumbersome procedures that make studying RNA methylation difficult, especially in application to diseases like cancer.

“I found myself in need of a tool,” says Anreiter. “I needed a way to easily analyze RNA methylation across large datasets and found that nothing existed – well, nothing existed yet.”

From fruit flies to machine learning

Anreiter’s doctoral research focused on the behaviour of fruit flies, specifically how inherited characteristics and environmental factors influence their feeding patterns. While searching for a way to study RNA methylation, her background led her to a unique idea.

Anreiter knew of nanopore sequencing – a relatively new type of sequencing technology that could decode DNA and RNA as it passes through a tiny channel. By directly reading a strand of RNA, Anreiter says, nanopore sequencing has the potential to revolutionize how we study RNA modifications. To this day, however, there are no algorithms or tools that can accurately find RNA methylation patterns in the output data of a nanopore sequencer.

Anreiter had also heard of Dr. Jared Simpson’s breakthrough methods for detecting DNA methylation using nanopore sequencing. His computational methods allowed the nanopore community to sequence the entire – highly-methylated – human genome in 2017, and since, he has been working in part to study RNA modifications, like RNA methylation, using nanopore sequencing.

Anreiter pitched her idea to Simpson.

“RNA methylation occurs in normal fruit flies, but not in a certain type of mutant fly,” says Anreiter. “I had a crazy idea that we could sequence both of these types, and use the datasets to develop a machine learning algorithm that could find RNA methylation on its own.”

The potential of her idea would win her the prestigious Schmidt Science Fellowship and a $100,000 USD stipend to work with Simpson for a year.

From machine learning to cancer patients

Anreiter recently began her year-long postdoctoral fellowship in the Simpson Lab at OICR where she is working alongside a team of computational biologists to turn her idea into an algorithm. She is cross-appointed with the University of Toronto’s Department of Computer Science.

“At this point, we’re working on a preliminary dataset, but I’ve already learned so much. The team has been very welcoming and supportive and we’re working together to make better tools to understand diseases.”

The Schmidt Fellowship, which was co-founded by the former CEO of Google, is awarded to exceptional, early-career researchers making a “pivot” in their work.  Anreiter saw the fellowship as an opportunity to immerse herself in a completely new field.

“If we can develop this tool, it would allow us to study human diseases in a new way,” Anreiter says. “When we look at a problem in a new way, we don’t know what solutions we’ll find, but this angle could lead us to new cures.”

Read the UofT News release on Anreiter’s award.

August 29, 2019

Addressing high priority issues in cancer care

An image of the report cover. Text: Addressing high priority issues in cancer care

OICR and Cancer Care Ontario’s Health Services Research Network releases the 2019 Synthesis Report, summarizing 14 studies that address high priority issues in cancer care

An excerpt from the foreword by Drs. Christine Williams and Eva Grunfeld:

Optimal cancer care across Ontario cannot be solely provided by a clinician or implemented by a researcher, enacted by a policy maker or attained by a patient. To improve the delivery of cancer services, we need to work together with stakeholders from across our rich cancer care ecosystem and involve them in prioritizing concerns, designing interventions and implementing solutions. For these reasons, OICR and Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) teamed up to co-create the OICR-CCO Health Services Research Network (HSRN).

Now, a decade later, we present our second Synthesis Report with an additional 14 studies that have emerged from this network. These studies have addressed high priority issues in cancer care including the gap in follow up after a positive colorectal cancer screening test, and the challenges that cancer patients face with co-existing chronic conditions like diabetes. The studies have led to the development of new methods to determine the burden of cancer in Ontario, and new resources to facilitate health services research across the province. This report provides summaries of these studies and others and their impact to date.

Read more about the OICR-CCO HSRN.

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